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natural preservatives? - Page 2

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessicaWiehle View Post

All my creations go in amber glass. It is expensive but highly recycleable, sanitizable, safe and blocks the light from damaging my products which is especially important when working with sensitive materials like anxioxidants and essential oils. Also, many actives/EOs will eat away at plastic and plastic off gasses considerably which means you wind up with toxins in your skin care products - no thanks. This might be why you see a lot of products sold in glass. If the manufacturer has done their research, they know glass is superior when it comes to storing skin care (or food for that matter).

Not to get off topic, but quite frankly, I strive to live as plastic free as possible. The level of toxins found in plastics here in the U.S. that continue to go unregulated is alarming. In fact I am becoming so nuts (perhaps I need prof. help?haha) that I check every single plastic item that comes into contact with myself or my family (including right down to making a new lap top purchase that is PVC free which is proving to be very difficult!) to avoid having exposure to the bad ones and insure that I am purchasing stuff that can be recyled in my area. When glass is an option for food, I take it over the plastic. Several plastics also absorb bacteria and those of us who are trying to stay as natural as possible such as myself, and Eden and several others i've come across here, we're just asking for trouble if we do not know enough about plastics to select the right ones. Polypropylene is a good one but I would not use EOs in it or any plastic so my only option really is glass. Especially now that i'm going to be investigating using the aforementioned EO blend as a preservative. Which brings me to my question (again, sorry to blab!)...

Eden - I see you posted the ratios and I have each of those oils. Thank you! My question is, exactly what percent needs to go into a product for it to be effective?

Some books I have say that most EOs on their face are microbial to some extent or one some level (antiviral, antibacterial or antifunal or a combo of some or all). I like the idea of using EOs in all my creations for their active properties, scent and preservation properties. It would be nice to know that each of my blends, to some extent, were preserving my products without drowning out the active properties or scents of oils I love to use like carrot seed oil, rose oil, ylang ylang, helichrysum, etc.

I lurked around the soapmaking forum. WOw, there is so much toiting around the use of parabens and other chemical preservatives and they really make it appear as though it is a MUST if you ever want to sell your products. I intend to sell locally, to my family, work pals, etc. I don't intend to make a career of it - I only want to help interested parties get safe skin care for a better value. But reading that forum really scared me into thinking I would never be able to do this without surrendering to a chemical. Ugh! I have been making my own oil/water emulsions for quite some time. I've never had a rash, gotten sick, or come across anything bad like mold or bacteria, in any of my creations. I know you can't always see it, and now they [posters on that forum] have effectively scared the crap out of me!

I missed your question, Jessica -- sorry.

You need at least 1% of the proper EO combo for preservation.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mantonis View Post

I have lemongrass EO but I'm afraid to use it cause I do not know if its photosensitive like lemon EO. Should I go for it or leave it? (it's a day cream)

I red on a Greek DIY site about 5% alcohol of the water phase can keep a base cream for 3-4 months. Weleda uses alcohol in her skin care products. What do you think? Is it true. I know it dries skin but I have used Weleda products with no dryness problems at all.

Mantanis, I am so glad you asked this question. I have Lemongrass EO also and hadn't thought of this at all.

Is that site saying Alcohol at 5% is a preservative? I'm yet to make my first creme and I am getting antsy to do it.
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post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckeydorn View Post

Mantanis, I am so glad you asked this question. I have Lemongrass EO also and hadn't thought of this at all.

Is that site saying Alcohol at 5% is a preservative? I'm yet to make my first creme and I am getting antsy to do it.

Eden told me that you need at least 15% alcohol to preserve a formula. If you check Weleda's ingredient list on creams, there is alcohol denat on top of the list, which means it's high in percentage.

I'm going to buy Phenoxyethanol which is gentler than parabens (and I believe gentler from alcohol) but is still a chemical preservative. If you look at the ingredient list of "natural" products like face and body creams you will see that most of them are using Phenoxyethanol as a preservative.

I have made a face cream with EOS (tea tree, lavender, rose geranium, rosemary), Vit E and GSE and put it in an airless pump container but I still feel anxious about the shelf life of the product.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by edensong View Post

I missed your question, Jessica -- sorry.

You need at least 1% of the proper EO combo for preservation.

Thank you! I noticed you have your own business. Is this all you use in your products to preserve, Eden? HAve you ever had an issue with something going bad or a customer complaining that something has gone bad? You give me confidence that my creations will survive so long as I note their shelf life and use them up in time. Thanks again.
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post #25 of 30
Lema Oil

looks not bad....
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragoN View Post

Lema Oil

looks not bad....

This is similar to something I came across at a Yoga Festival here in MN not too long ago. The guy was marketing oil blends that were natural eo's pulled apart and put back together in different combos for things to be more microbial.

I have Manuka Honey and Tea Tree oil. I wonder if I tossed some honey into my creams and kept the tea tree and other EOs at at least 1% if I would be covered? Trial and error, baby!
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post #27 of 30
Jessica,
You might like this article.
Quote:
Originally Posted by View Post

In the last few years, a number of laboratory studies have revealed the efficacy of plant extracts and phytochemicals as antimicrobials. These properties are attributed to the presence of secondary metabolites such as phenolics in essential oils and tannins in herbal extracts. Some examples of classes of natural materials that afford antimicrobial protection include essential oils such as tea tree oil, rosemary oil and turmeric oil; plant extracts such as rosemary extract, sage extract, lemon balm extract, green tea extract, Kaempferia galanga extract, Neem leaf extract and oil, and isolated phytochemicals such as cinnamates, benzoates, eugenol.

Natural antimicrobials and preservatives: an emerging trend in personal care
Quote:
Originally Posted by View Post

However, too often preservatives were used as a substitute for hygienic manufacture and good manufacturing practices and the industry is seeing a backlash against preservatives by significant numbers of consumers.

..and this one Preservatives: Getting the balance right

I don't panic over bugs in my creations. Like yourself...nothing I have ever made has had a bad reaction on my skin due to anything or has had "Life" burst forth of its own accord.

There is more money to be made in scare tactics than there is in educating people.
post #28 of 30

Very good discussion.

In fact, there needs to be much more people experimenting with this, and sharing this, so that more natural preservatives are used in our daily products.

 

Essential oils against molds, more or less by order of strenght: cynnamon, clove, lemongrass, palmarosa, eucalyptus citriodora, benzoin resin, tea tree, marjoram. 

Good essential oils against bacteria include thyme, oregano, basil, and some of the above.

 

Cynnamon and clove oils are powerful but you must use little on the skin. They are effective at 0.4%, best use them at 0.1 or 0.05%.

The others are more safe, but have some strong scents, and must be combined in a proper amount, and kept at less than 0.2% each.

Each recipe would need a different combination. 

 

Good to add 10% glycerin to your cream, so it reduces water activity and bacteria will not grow so easily.

 

Some plant extracts are also preservatives but best combined with the oils above (aspen, olive leaf, honeysuckle, usnea, goldenseal...)

post #29 of 30

Using alcohol or tincture (96%):

 

It need to use at least 8% to preserve. Although at 6% the creams will keep well, if done clean.

 

However, molds might still grow in 8% (but only if you treat your creams badly), so 13% is a minimum to be on the safe side (some yeasts still grow, namely wine yeasts).

Use 15% for total protection (think of self-preserving alcoholic drinks).

 

 

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by edensong View Post


I missed your question, Jessica -- sorry.

You need at least 1% of the proper EO combo for preservation.



Hey Eden!  Was wondering...when you say 1% of EO combo, do you mean a total of 1% between all EO's, or 1% for each EO used within a product?  I am trying to go as natural as possible, but am wondering if there is something that will make this process a little simpler.

 

Thanks.

 

Natasha

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