Skin Care Talk banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Research shows that there are, in fact, two distinct types of aging. Aging caused by the genes we inherit is called intrinsic (internal) aging. The other type of aging is known as extrinsic (external) aging and is caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to the sun?s rays.

Intrinsic Aging (10%)
Intrinsic aging, also known as the natural aging process, is a continuous process that normally begins in our mid-20s. Within the skin, collagen production slows, and elastin, the substance that enables skin to snap back into place, has a bit less spring. Dead skin cells do not shed as quickly and turnover of new skin cells may decrease slightly. While these changes usually begin in our 20s, the signs of intrinsic aging are typically not visible for decades. The signs of intrinsic aging are:
?\tFine wrinkles
?\tThin and transparent skin
?\tLoss of underlying fat, leading to hollowed cheeks and eye sockets as well as noticeable loss of firmness on the hands and neck
?\tBones shrink away from the skin due to bone loss, which causes sagging skin
?\tDry skin that may itch
?\tInability to sweat sufficiently to cool the skin
?\tGraying hair that eventually turns white
?\tHair loss
?\tUnwanted hair
?\tNail plate thins, the half moons disappear, and ridges develops
Genes control how quickly the normal aging process unfolds. Some notice those first gray hairs in their 20s; others do not see graying until their 40s. People with Werner?s syndrome, a rare inherited condition that rapidly accelerates the normal aging process, usually appear elderly in their 30s. Their hair can gray and thin considerably in their teens. Cataracts may appear in their 20s. The average life expectancy for people with Werner?s syndrome is 46 years of age.

Extrinsic Aging (90%)
A number of extrinsic, or external, factors often act together with the normal aging process to prematurely age our skin. Most premature aging is caused by sun exposure. Other external factors that prematurely age our skin are repetitive facial expressions, gravity, sleeping positions, and smoking.

The Sun. Without protection from the sun?s rays, just a few minutes of exposure each day over the years can cause noticeable changes to the skin. Freckles, age spots, spider veins on the face, rough and leathery skin, fine wrinkles that disappear when stretched, loose skin, a blotchy complexion, actinic keratoses (thick wart-like, rough, reddish patches of skin), and skin cancer can all be traced to sun exposure.

?Photoaging? is the term dermatologists use to describe this type of aging caused by exposure to the sun?s rays. The amount of photoaging that develops depends on: 1) a person?s skin color and 2) their history of long-term or intense sun exposure. People with fair skin who have a history of sun exposure develop more signs of photoaging than those with dark skin. In the darkest skin, the signs of photoaging are usually limited to fine wrinkles and a mottled complexion.

Photoaging occurs over a period of years. With repeated exposure to the sun, the skin loses the ability to repair itself, and the damage accumulates. Scientific studies have shown that repeated ultraviolet (UV) exposure breaks down collagen and impairs the synthesis of new collagen. The sun also attacks our elastin. Sun-weakened skin ceases to spring back much earlier than skin protected from UV rays. Skin also becomes loose, wrinkled, and leathery much earlier with unprotected exposure to sunlight.

The deep wrinkles, age spots, and leathery skin indicate premature aging caused by years of unprotected exposure to the sun.

(Photo used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides)




People who live in sun-intense areas, such as Florida or Arizona, can show signs of photoaging in their 20s. In fact, some people who live in sun-intense areas develop actinic keratoses (AKs) and skin cancer in their 20s.

While it may seem that the signs of photoaging appear overnight, they actually lie invisible beneath the surface of the skin for years. UV photography enables us to see the damage accumulating beneath the surface of the skin years before the signs of photoaging appear. Most people are surprised by the amount of photoaging that the UV camera shows. To see actual patient photographs that show: 1) what is visible to the naked eye and 2) what damage lies beneath the surface, visit.


Facial Expressions. If you perform facial exercises to maintain a youthful-looking appearance, it is time to stop. Repetitive facial movements actually lead to fine lines and wrinkles. Each time we use a facial muscle, a groove forms beneath the surface of the skin, which is why we see lines form with each facial expression. As skin ages and loses its elasticity, the skin stops springing back to its line-free state, and these grooves become permanently etched on the face as fine lines and wrinkles.

Gravity. Gravity constantly pulls on our bodies. Changes related to gravity become more pronounced as we age. In our 50s, when the skin?s elasticity declines dramatically, the effects of gravity become evident. Gravity causes the tip of the nose to droop, the ears to elongate, the eyelids to fall, jowls to form, and the upper lip to disappear while the lower lip becomes more pronounced.

Sleeping Positions. Resting your face on the pillow in the same way every night for years on end also leads to wrinkles. Called sleep lines, these wrinkles eventually become etched on the surface of the skin and no longer disappear when the head is not resting on the pillow. Women, who tend to sleep on their sides, are most likely to see these lines appear on their chin and cheeks. Men tend to notice these lines on the forehead since they usually sleep with the face pressed face down on the pillow. People who sleep on their backs do not develop these wrinkles since their skin does not lie crumpled against the pillow.

Smoking. Cigarette smoking causes biochemical changes in our bodies that accelerate aging. Research shows that a person who smokes 10 or more cigarettes a day for a minimum of 10 years is statistically more likely to develop deeply wrinkled, leathery skin than a nonsmoker. It also has been shown that people who smoke for a number of years tend to develop an unhealthy yellowish hue to their complexion. Additionally, a study conducted in 2002 showed that facial wrinkling, while not yet visible, can be seen under a microscope in smokers as young as 20.

These signs can be greatly diminished, and in some cases avoided, by stopping smoking. Even people who have smoked for many years, or smoked heavily at a younger age, show less facial wrinkling and improved skin tone when they quit smoking.

For Healthier, Younger-Looking Skin
Prevention. While you cannot stop or even slow down the intrinsic aging process, you can prevent signs of premature aging by protecting your skin from the sun, quitting smoking, and eliminating facial exercises.

Dermatologists recommend comprehensive sun protection to prevent premature aging caused by the sun. Comprehensive sun protection includes:
?\tAvoiding deliberate tanning, including use of indoor tanning devices.
?\tStaying out of the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., when the sun?s rays are the strongest.
?\tWearing protective clothing, such as a wide-brimmed hat and long sleeves, when outdoors during the day.
?\tApplying sunscreen year round. Sunscreen should be broad spectrum (offers UVA and UVB protection) and have a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Sunscreen should be applied 20 minutes before going outdoors to all skin that will be exposed. It should be reapplied after sweating or being in water.
Treatment. If you are bothered by visible signs of aging, a number of treatments are available. Injectable fillers and botulinum toxin are suitable for people with busy lifestyles who do not want the inconvenience of a long recovery. Radiofrequency is a procedure that offers an alternative to the traditional facelift. Dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, chemical peeling, microdermabrasion, and some topical treatments can restore skin, giving it a smoother and refreshed appearance.

Scientific research in the field of anti-aging continues to give rise to new and promising treatment options. A dermatologist can help you sort through the numerous options, including the myriad of over-the-counter products. During a consultation, the dermatologist will examine your skin, discuss your expectations, and recommend suitable treatment options.

References:
American Academy of Dermatology. ?Turning Back the Hands of Time.? February 21, 2005.
Available here . Accessed June 20, 2005.

Demierre MF et al. ?Public knowledge, awareness, and perceptions of the association between skin aging and smoking.? Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 1999 Jul;41(1):27-30.

Fisher GJ. ?The Pathophysiology of Photoaging of the Skin.? Cutis, 2005 Feb;75(2S):5-9.

Koh JS et al. ?Cigarette smoking associated with premature facial wrinkling: image analysis of facial skin replicas.? International Journal of Dermatology, 2002 Jan;41(1)21-27.

Moschella S and Hurley H. (1992) ?Aging and Its Effects on the Skin.? Dermatology: Third Edition. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company.

Oikarinen A. ?Aging of the skin connective tissue: how to measure the biochemical and mechanical properties of aging dermis.? Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedicine, 1994 Apr;10(2):47-52.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Most of the articles I'm posting I've researched and taken from other sites in my quest for knowledge about skincare. Some I've typed up/composed (and I have copies) or just have the copies I found.

Can you tell I refuse to grow old gracefully? I plan on kicking and screaming ALL THE WAY and hope there are no signs otherwise! LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Research shows that there are, in fact, two distinct types of aging. Aging caused by the genes we inherit is called intrinsic (internal) aging. The other type of aging is known as extrinsic (external) aging and is caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to the sun’s rays.

Intrinsic Aging (10%)
Intrinsic aging, also known as the natural aging process, is a continuous process that normally begins in our mid-20s. Within the skin, collagen production slows, and elastin, the substance that enables skin to snap back into place, has a bit less spring. Dead skin cells do not shed as quickly and turnover of new skin cells may decrease slightly. While these changes usually begin in our 20s, the signs of intrinsic aging are typically not visible for decades. The signs of intrinsic aging are:
• Fine wrinkles
• Thin and transparent skin
• Loss of underlying fat, leading to hollowed cheeks and eye sockets as well as noticeable loss of firmness on the hands and neck
• Bones shrink away from the skin due to bone loss, which causes sagging skin
• Dry skin that may itch
• Inability to sweat sufficiently to cool the skin
• Graying hair that eventually turns white
• Hair loss
• Unwanted hair
• Nail plate thins, the half moons disappear, and ridges develops
Genes control how quickly the normal aging process unfolds. Some notice those first gray hairs in their 20s; others do not see graying until their 40s. People with Werner’s syndrome, a rare inherited condition that rapidly accelerates the normal aging process, usually appear elderly in their 30s. Their hair can gray and thin considerably in their teens. Cataracts may appear in their 20s. The average life expectancy for people with Werner’s syndrome is 46 years of age.

Extrinsic Aging (90%)
A number of extrinsic, or external, factors often act together with the normal aging process to prematurely age our skin. Most premature aging is caused by sun exposure. Other external factors that prematurely age our skin are repetitive facial expressions, gravity, sleeping positions, and smoking.

The Sun. Without protection from the sun’s rays, just a few minutes of exposure each day over the years can cause noticeable changes to the skin. Freckles, age spots, spider veins on the face, rough and leathery skin, fine wrinkles that disappear when stretched, loose skin, a blotchy complexion, actinic keratoses (thick wart-like, rough, reddish patches of skin), and skin cancer can all be traced to sun exposure.

“Photoaging” is the term dermatologists use to describe this type of aging caused by exposure to the sun’s rays. The amount of photoaging that develops depends on: 1) a person’s skin color and 2) their history of long-term or intense sun exposure. People with fair skin who have a history of sun exposure develop more signs of photoaging than those with dark skin. In the darkest skin, the signs of photoaging are usually limited to fine wrinkles and a mottled complexion.

Photoaging occurs over a period of years. With repeated exposure to the sun, the skin loses the ability to repair itself, and the damage accumulates. Scientific studies have shown that repeated ultraviolet (UV) exposure breaks down collagen and impairs the synthesis of new collagen. The sun also attacks our elastin. Sun-weakened skin ceases to spring back much earlier than skin protected from UV rays. Skin also becomes loose, wrinkled, and leathery much earlier with unprotected exposure to sunlight.

The deep wrinkles, age spots, and leathery skin indicate premature aging caused by years of unprotected exposure to the sun.

(Photo used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides)




People who live in sun-intense areas, such as Florida or Arizona, can show signs of photoaging in their 20s. In fact, some people who live in sun-intense areas develop actinic keratoses (AKs) and skin cancer in their 20s.

While it may seem that the signs of photoaging appear overnight, they actually lie invisible beneath the surface of the skin for years. UV photography enables us to see the damage accumulating beneath the surface of the skin years before the signs of photoaging appear. Most people are surprised by the amount of photoaging that the UV camera shows. To see actual patient photographs that show: 1) what is visible to the naked eye and 2) what damage lies beneath the surface, visit.


Facial Expressions. If you perform facial exercises to maintain a youthful-looking appearance, it is time to stop. Repetitive facial movements actually lead to fine lines and wrinkles. Each time we use a facial muscle, a groove forms beneath the surface of the skin, which is why we see lines form with each facial expression. As skin ages and loses its elasticity, the skin stops springing back to its line-free state, and these grooves become permanently etched on the face as fine lines and wrinkles.

Gravity. Gravity constantly pulls on our bodies. Changes related to gravity become more pronounced as we age. In our 50s, when the skin’s elasticity declines dramatically, the effects of gravity become evident. Gravity causes the tip of the nose to droop, the ears to elongate, the eyelids to fall, jowls to form, and the upper lip to disappear while the lower lip becomes more pronounced.

Sleeping Positions. Resting your face on the pillow in the same way every night for years on end also leads to wrinkles. Called sleep lines, these wrinkles eventually become etched on the surface of the skin and no longer disappear when the head is not resting on the pillow. Women, who tend to sleep on their sides, are most likely to see these lines appear on their chin and cheeks. Men tend to notice these lines on the forehead since they usually sleep with the face pressed face down on the pillow. People who sleep on their backs do not develop these wrinkles since their skin does not lie crumpled against the pillow.

Smoking. Cigarette smoking causes biochemical changes in our bodies that accelerate aging. Research shows that a person who smokes 10 or more cigarettes a day for a minimum of 10 years is statistically more likely to develop deeply wrinkled, leathery skin than a nonsmoker. It also has been shown that people who smoke for a number of years tend to develop an unhealthy yellowish hue to their complexion. Additionally, a study conducted in 2002 showed that facial wrinkling, while not yet visible, can be seen under a microscope in smokers as young as 20.

These signs can be greatly diminished, and in some cases avoided, by stopping smoking. Even people who have smoked for many years, or smoked heavily at a younger age, show less facial wrinkling and improved skin tone when they quit smoking.

For Healthier, Younger-Looking Skin
Prevention. While you cannot stop or even slow down the intrinsic aging process, you can prevent signs of premature aging by protecting your skin from the sun, quitting smoking, and eliminating facial exercises.

Dermatologists recommend comprehensive sun protection to prevent premature aging caused by the sun. Comprehensive sun protection includes:
• Avoiding deliberate tanning, including use of indoor tanning devices.
• Staying out of the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
• Wearing protective clothing, such as a wide-brimmed hat and long sleeves, when outdoors during the day.
• Applying sunscreen year round. Sunscreen should be broad spectrum (offers UVA and UVB protection) and have a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Sunscreen should be applied 20 minutes before going outdoors to all skin that will be exposed. It should be reapplied after sweating or being in water.
Treatment. If you are bothered by visible signs of aging, a number of treatments are available. Injectable fillers and botulinum toxin are suitable for people with busy lifestyles who do not want the inconvenience of a long recovery. Radiofrequency is a procedure that offers an alternative to the traditional facelift. Dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, chemical peeling, microdermabrasion, and some topical treatments can restore skin, giving it a smoother and refreshed appearance.

Scientific research in the field of anti-aging continues to give rise to new and promising treatment options. A dermatologist can help you sort through the numerous options, including the myriad of over-the-counter products. During a consultation, the dermatologist will examine your skin, discuss your expectations, and recommend suitable treatment options.

References:
American Academy of Dermatology. “Turning Back the Hands of Time.” February 21, 2005.
Available here . Accessed June 20, 2005.

Demierre MF et al. “Public knowledge, awareness, and perceptions of the association between skin aging and smoking.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 1999 Jul;41(1):27-30.

Fisher GJ. “The Pathophysiology of Photoaging of the Skin.” Cutis, 2005 Feb;75(2S):5-9.

Koh JS et al. “Cigarette smoking associated with premature facial wrinkling: image analysis of facial skin replicas.” International Journal of Dermatology, 2002 Jan;41(1)21-27.

Moschella S and Hurley H. (1992) “Aging and Its Effects on the Skin.” Dermatology: Third Edition. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company.

Oikarinen A. “Aging of the skin connective tissue: how to measure the biochemical and mechanical properties of aging dermis.” Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedicine, 1994 Apr;10(2):47-52.
HMM!
Great post! Good tips!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Yeah, you gotta watch that sun.
I read a study recently that showed how drivers exposed to the sun can get cancer on that side of their face. That would be weird having one side of the face being more wrinkly than the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Yeah, you gotta watch that sun.
I read a study recently that showed how drivers exposed to the sun can get cancer on that side of their face. That would be weird having one side of the face being more wrinkly than the other.
strange... I thought that glass blocks alot of the UV rays from the sun??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
A website was mentioned where 2 physics experts answered that glass does, indeed, have UV ray blocking capabilities, depending on the type of glass. Some forum members, despite that information, said it was not possible.
about . com

Ordinary glass is partially transparent to UVA but is opaque to shorter wavelengths while Silica or quartz glass, depending on quality, can be transparent even to vacuum UV wavelengths. Ordinary window glass passes about 90% of the light above 350 nm, but blocks over 90% of the light below 300 nm[1][2][3].
wikipedia

Can you get sunburned through a car windshield? --Brad, Loma Linda, California

A: Only if you try hard. A car's windshield blocks about 85% of the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Other car windows block only about half.
wonderquest

But when I kept reading, I saw a lot of advertisements for tinting to block harmful sun rays??? so I don't know what to believe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Yes very depend information and thanks a lot.

Actually , in additional we need to aware also the inside factor affecting our skin look. What we eat is definitely have a great effect on our skin.

Any Happy Day to All of You !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Research shows that there are, in fact, two distinct types of aging. Aging caused by the genes we inherit is called intrinsic (internal) aging. The other type of aging is known as extrinsic (external) aging and is caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to the sun’s rays.

Intrinsic Aging (10%)
Intrinsic aging, also known as the natural aging process, is a continuous process that normally begins in our mid-20s. Within the skin, collagen production slows, and elastin, the substance that enables skin to snap back into place, has a bit less spring. Dead skin cells do not shed as quickly and turnover of new skin cells may decrease slightly. While these changes usually begin in our 20s, the signs of intrinsic aging are typically not visible for decades. The signs of intrinsic aging are:
• Fine wrinkles
• Thin and transparent skin
• Loss of underlying fat, leading to hollowed cheeks and eye sockets as well as noticeable loss of firmness on the hands and neck
• Bones shrink away from the skin due to bone loss, which causes sagging skin
• Dry skin that may itch
• Inability to sweat sufficiently to cool the skin
• Graying hair that eventually turns white
• Hair loss
• Unwanted hair
• Nail plate thins, the half moons disappear, and ridges develops
Genes control how quickly the normal aging process unfolds. Some notice those first gray hairs in their 20s; others do not see graying until their 40s. People with Werner’s syndrome, a rare inherited condition that rapidly accelerates the normal aging process, usually appear elderly in their 30s. Their hair can gray and thin considerably in their teens. Cataracts may appear in their 20s. The average life expectancy for people with Werner’s syndrome is 46 years of age.

Extrinsic Aging (90%)
A number of extrinsic, or external, factors often act together with the normal aging process to prematurely age our skin. Most premature aging is caused by sun exposure. Other external factors that prematurely age our skin are repetitive facial expressions, gravity, sleeping positions, and smoking.

The Sun. Without protection from the sun’s rays, just a few minutes of exposure each day over the years can cause noticeable changes to the skin. Freckles, age spots, spider veins on the face, rough and leathery skin, fine wrinkles that disappear when stretched, loose skin, a blotchy complexion, actinic keratoses (thick wart-like, rough, reddish patches of skin), and skin cancer can all be traced to sun exposure.

“Photoaging” is the term dermatologists use to describe this type of aging caused by exposure to the sun’s rays. The amount of photoaging that develops depends on: 1) a person’s skin color and 2) their history of long-term or intense sun exposure. People with fair skin who have a history of sun exposure develop more signs of photoaging than those with dark skin. In the darkest skin, the signs of photoaging are usually limited to fine wrinkles and a mottled complexion.

Photoaging occurs over a period of years. With repeated exposure to the sun, the skin loses the ability to repair itself, and the damage accumulates. Scientific studies have shown that repeated ultraviolet (UV) exposure breaks down collagen and impairs the synthesis of new collagen. The sun also attacks our elastin. Sun-weakened skin ceases to spring back much earlier than skin protected from UV rays. Skin also becomes loose, wrinkled, and leathery much earlier with unprotected exposure to sunlight.

The deep wrinkles, age spots, and leathery skin indicate premature aging caused by years of unprotected exposure to the sun.

(Photo used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides)




People who live in sun-intense areas, such as Florida or Arizona, can show signs of photoaging in their 20s. In fact, some people who live in sun-intense areas develop actinic keratoses (AKs) and skin cancer in their 20s.

While it may seem that the signs of photoaging appear overnight, they actually lie invisible beneath the surface of the skin for years. UV photography enables us to see the damage accumulating beneath the surface of the skin years before the signs of photoaging appear. Most people are surprised by the amount of photoaging that the UV camera shows. To see actual patient photographs that show: 1) what is visible to the naked eye and 2) what damage lies beneath the surface, visit.


Facial Expressions. If you perform facial exercises to maintain a youthful-looking appearance, it is time to stop. Repetitive facial movements actually lead to fine lines and wrinkles. Each time we use a facial muscle, a groove forms beneath the surface of the skin, which is why we see lines form with each facial expression. As skin ages and loses its elasticity, the skin stops springing back to its line-free state, and these grooves become permanently etched on the face as fine lines and wrinkles.

Gravity. Gravity constantly pulls on our bodies. Changes related to gravity become more pronounced as we age. In our 50s, when the skin’s elasticity declines dramatically, the effects of gravity become evident. Gravity causes the tip of the nose to droop, the ears to elongate, the eyelids to fall, jowls to form, and the upper lip to disappear while the lower lip becomes more pronounced.

Sleeping Positions. Resting your face on the pillow in the same way every night for years on end also leads to wrinkles. Called sleep lines, these wrinkles eventually become etched on the surface of the skin and no longer disappear when the head is not resting on the pillow. Women, who tend to sleep on their sides, are most likely to see these lines appear on their chin and cheeks. Men tend to notice these lines on the forehead since they usually sleep with the face pressed face down on the pillow. People who sleep on their backs do not develop these wrinkles since their skin does not lie crumpled against the pillow.

Smoking. Cigarette smoking causes biochemical changes in our bodies that accelerate aging. Research shows that a person who smokes 10 or more cigarettes a day for a minimum of 10 years is statistically more likely to develop deeply wrinkled, leathery skin than a nonsmoker. It also has been shown that people who smoke for a number of years tend to develop an unhealthy yellowish hue to their complexion. Additionally, a study conducted in 2002 showed that facial wrinkling, while not yet visible, can be seen under a microscope in smokers as young as 20.

These signs can be greatly diminished, and in some cases avoided, by stopping smoking. Even people who have smoked for many years, or smoked heavily at a younger age, show less facial wrinkling and improved skin tone when they quit smoking.

For Healthier, Younger-Looking Skin
Prevention. While you cannot stop or even slow down the intrinsic aging process, you can prevent signs of premature aging by protecting your skin from the sun, quitting smoking, and eliminating facial exercises.

Dermatologists recommend comprehensive sun protection to prevent premature aging caused by the sun. Comprehensive sun protection includes:
• Avoiding deliberate tanning, including use of indoor tanning devices.
• Staying out of the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
• Wearing protective clothing, such as a wide-brimmed hat and long sleeves, when outdoors during the day.
• Applying sunscreen year round. Sunscreen should be broad spectrum (offers UVA and UVB protection) and have a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Sunscreen should be applied 20 minutes before going outdoors to all skin that will be exposed. It should be reapplied after sweating or being in water.
Treatment. If you are bothered by visible signs of aging, a number of treatments are available. Injectable fillers and botulinum toxin are suitable for people with busy lifestyles who do not want the inconvenience of a long recovery. Radiofrequency is a procedure that offers an alternative to the traditional facelift. Dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, chemical peeling, microdermabrasion, and some topical treatments can restore skin, giving it a smoother and refreshed appearance.

Scientific research in the field of anti-aging continues to give rise to new and promising treatment options. A dermatologist can help you sort through the numerous options, including the myriad of over-the-counter products. During a consultation, the dermatologist will examine your skin, discuss your expectations, and recommend suitable treatment options.

References:
American Academy of Dermatology. “Turning Back the Hands of Time.” February 21, 2005.
Available here . Accessed June 20, 2005.

Demierre MF et al. “Public knowledge, awareness, and perceptions of the association between skin aging and smoking.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 1999 Jul;41(1):27-30.

Fisher GJ. “The Pathophysiology of Photoaging of the Skin.” Cutis, 2005 Feb;75(2S):5-9.

Koh JS et al. “Cigarette smoking associated with premature facial wrinkling: image analysis of facial skin replicas.” International Journal of Dermatology, 2002 Jan;41(1)21-27.



This is a great posting and I totally agree with all thats indicated here. As for myself, I use products that are not chemically based. I used to be a smoker , acne suffer and quit.I got my natural moisture back and stay natural. My favortie of all the product I use and I can't leave the house without the travel size bottle of this in my purse is my HABErry! pH Cleanser and for my skin not to be immune with the product,I alternate it monthly with the SEAWEED AND GREENTEA Cleanser.Awesome!


Functional Aging means wisdom when
"We put life into our years, not years into our lives" .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
This is a great posting and I totally agree with all thats indicated here. As for myself, I use products that are not chemically based. I used to be a smoker , acne suffer and quit.I got my natural moisture back and stay natural. My favortie of all the product I use and I can't leave the house without the travel size bottle of this in my purse is my HABErry! pH Cleanser and for my skin not to be immune with the product,I alternate it monthly with the SEAWEED AND GREENTEA Cleanser.Awesome!


Functional Aging means wisdom when
"We put life into our years, not years into our lives" .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
I found this post and was interested and wanted to revive it. I do agree that sun exposure is a cause of premature aging but I do not agree with the 10/90 ratio. I know people that never smoked, drank, ate well and NEVER were in the sun (friends of my mothers in UK for example) and these women still get old as soon as the late 40's early 50's hit. Likewise I know women who are in the sun their whole lives and look relatively young even into the late 40's early 50's. I do not think heavy deliberate sun exposure is good for you, in fact even as a former tanorexic I think it probably does considerably age some people faster than they should, but on the other hand I do not think that it is healthy to completely avoid the sun and many dermatologist actually agree. The sun exposure, in moderation, that most people get is needed for many bodily functions. Obviously darker skinned people evolved to tolerate more sun exposure and lighter people less but even lighter people are light so that the little exposure they get will be absorbed not defended against. There is also a school of thought that emerged recently stating many sunblocks are worse than sun exposure for the skin. I am not advocating tanning as I see myself the premature aging it causes but at the same time I think placing 90% on extrinsic factors is excessive and not correct. Certainly I can imagine this was written by a very thoughtful person with strong convictions about the subject but I bet for as many medical professionals that will agree with it as many will disagree.

Madonna is a great example to me of somoene who epitomises healthy living. She has dieted, worked out, and lived well since her 20's with cardio, strength training, aerobic and well-rounded excercise regimes, if not excessive, she is KNOWN for sun-avoidance and is seen rarely in any sunny location and when she is she is seen with a sun-hate, shirts and covered as much as one can be. YET, with all this she needed a team of plastic surgeons to keep her young. I saw her face to face in 2003 and not only was she wrinkled in the face, with deep naso-labial folds, crow's feet (all have since disappeared) and fine wrinkling all over her face and neck, but also her hands looked aged, her body skin was aged, she had a very "old" looking skin all over. She has since reversed much of that through--if it is to be believed, multiple full body peels, chemical facial peels, dermabrasion, retin-a use from head to toe, a thread lift, face-lift (mid then full just about a year ago) fillers, botox, and more. Now I am the first to want to believe we have some control over aging and I do think we do have SOME control, but I think other than those who bake in the sun, moderate sun exposure is at best going to bring you to where you would be perhaps 7 years earlier which in the scheme of things is not that significant. Extreme suntanning will result in a much more significant premature aging and also your skin type will determine what is moderate and tolerable, again based on genetics.

It is like all things, moderation, a word I am now learning--too much skin care can also damage the skin as I unfortunately learned!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
I found this post and was interested and wanted to revive it. I do agree that sun exposure is a cause of premature aging but I do not agree with the 10/90 ratio. I know people that never smoked, drank, ate well and NEVER were in the sun (friends of my mothers in UK for example) and these women still get old as soon as the late 40's early 50's hit. Likewise I know women who are in the sun their whole lives and look relatively young even into the late 40's early 50's. I do not think heavy deliberate sun exposure is good for you, in fact even as a former tanorexic I think it probably does considerably age some people faster than they should, but on the other hand I do not think that it is healthy to completely avoid the sun and many dermatologist actually agree. The sun exposure, in moderation, that most people get is needed for many bodily functions. Obviously darker skinned people evolved to tolerate more sun exposure and lighter people less but even lighter people are light so that the little exposure they get will be absorbed not defended against. There is also a school of thought that emerged recently stating many sunblocks are worse than sun exposure for the skin. I am not advocating tanning as I see myself the premature aging it causes but at the same time I think placing 90% on extrinsic factors is excessive and not correct. Certainly I can imagine this was written by a very thoughtful person with strong convictions about the subject but I bet for as many medical professionals that will agree with it as many will disagree.

Madonna is a great example to me of somoene who epitomises healthy living. She has dieted, worked out, and lived well since her 20's with cardio, strength training, aerobic and well-rounded excercise regimes, if not excessive, she is KNOWN for sun-avoidance and is seen rarely in any sunny location and when she is she is seen with a sun-hate, shirts and covered as much as one can be. YET, with all this she needed a team of plastic surgeons to keep her young. I saw her face to face in 2003 and not only was she wrinkled in the face, with deep naso-labial folds, crow's feet (all have since disappeared) and fine wrinkling all over her face and neck, but also her hands looked aged, her body skin was aged, she had a very "old" looking skin all over. She has since reversed much of that through--if it is to be believed, multiple full body peels, chemical facial peels, dermabrasion, retin-a use from head to toe, a thread lift, face-lift (mid then full just about a year ago) fillers, botox, and more. Now I am the first to want to believe we have some control over aging and I do think we do have SOME control, but I think other than those who bake in the sun, moderate sun exposure is at best going to bring you to where you would be perhaps 7 years earlier which in the scheme of things is not that significant. Extreme suntanning will result in a much more significant premature aging and also your skin type will determine what is moderate and tolerable, again based on genetics.

It is like all things, moderation, a word I am now learning--too much skin care can also damage the skin as I unfortunately learned!
I believe it is more around a 20/80 ratio myself. Just too much info. I've read about the sun being so responsible for the majority of skin aging.
Yes genetics do play a huge role. All my family members (3 sisters) are not even close to being into health and protecting their skin as much as I am. They all look exeptionally young for their ages. Mom is 65 with no facial wrinkles.
I'm one who does not believe you have to get a certain amount of sun daily. The right amount of vitamin D3 can take care of your D requirement. I am aware of the mood enhancing effect of the sun as well as a few others but IMO it is not worth the cumulative damage you'll receive daily. It's pretty much impossible to completely avoid the sun unless you work nights maybe.
Yes using the wrong kind of sunscreen and not applying it properly or enough can be worse than not using it in the first place. Sunscreens that are not stabalized with ingredients such as octocrylene, the mexoryls and the tinsorbs can cause free radical damage to the skin from the sunscreen breaking down from the uv rays.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Peri,
OK so now tell me about your mom who is 65 without wrinkles....what do you attribute this to? Genetics? Sun protection? Supplements? Skin care products? Good nutrition? Good luck?? LOL. Details please!!



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
Peri,
OK so now tell me about your mom who is 65 without wrinkles....what do you attribute this to? Genetics? Sun protection? Supplements? Skin care products? Good nutrition? Good luck?? LOL. Details please!!
Genes. She's definetley not into health protection like I am. She does have a couple of major health issues but her skin looks great. And she's not overweight so the fat issue is not protecting her from wrinkles...lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
I do not believe "laying" in the sun is good for you, I came to that conclusion as I have slowly come to accept (yes as a tanorexic I had to accept this) that it is going to cause premature aging. BUT I do not think total sun avoidance is normal either nor is it going to significantly change what genetics gave you. I am not into the percentages I am just into now trying to live healthy and moderately. To avoid the sun where I live would mean I would have to become a hermit and not living is as bad as wrinkling as I would rather live and then become a hermit than go into hiding while my skin is still good. I think a huge wake-up to me with product over-use and all my other excesses was when I read about Madonna's evening ritual which sounded shockingly similar to me (packing herself in a body suit with a zillion creams on) and I realised nothing can really hold back the years in the end and living healthy, sensibly and moderately is probably the best thing I can do.

I just did find it strikingly odd to see 90% attributed to non-genetic factors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
I do not believe "laying" in the sun is good for you, I came to that conclusion as I have slowly come to accept (yes as a tanorexic I had to accept this) that it is going to cause premature aging. BUT I do not think total sun avoidance is normal either nor is it going to significantly change what genetics gave you. I am not into the percentages I am just into now trying to live healthy and moderately. To avoid the sun where I live would mean I would have to become a hermit and not living is as bad as wrinkling as I would rather live and then become a hermit than go into hiding while my skin is still good. I think a huge wake-up to me with product over-use and all my other excesses was when I read about Madonna's evening ritual which sounded shockingly similar to me (packing herself in a body suit with a zillion creams on) and I realised nothing can really hold back the years in the end and living healthy, sensibly and moderately is probably the best thing I can do.

I just did find it strikingly odd to see 90% attributed to non-genetic factors.
We'll just have to agree to disagree on this one.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top