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Discussion Starter #1
The cosmetic industry tries to create confusion over the actions of retinol (retinyl palmitate, vitamin A) and those of retinoic acid (used in Retin-A and Renova). Even though the molecules are very similar and can be easily converted to the other molecule, their biochemical actions are often opposite. A biochemical analogy is that one key (or molecule) opens a lock while a very similar molecule, like a defective key, jams the lock. Retinoic acid reduces skin oil and has well-proven wrinkle reduction actions. Retinol tends to increase skin oil and has only very modest anti-wrinkle actions. Retinol has been in skin products for the last 60 years - obviously with little effect on wrinkle formation. Some cosmetic facial products that are advertised to contain retinol have only 0.001% retinol - a biologically insignificant amount that does nothing.

Comparison between Retinol and Retinoic Acid

Retinyl palmitate, vitamin A, retinol: (effects) Improves skin moisturization, Reduces protein breakdown, said to reduce wrinkles; (potential problems) low, can cause breakouts in acne prone skin area in younger people

Retinoic acid, Retin-A?, Renova?: (effects) reduces skin oil, reduces wrinkles, reduces acne; (potential problems) High, irritation and redness, (lobster face syndrome), very drying to skin, increases production of the scar forming growth factor (TGF beta 1)

Vitamin A/Retinol helps to remove wrinkles mainly by reducing collagen/elastin degradation. A protein complex called AP-1 produces the enzymes that break apart and degrade collagen and elastin, the major structural materials in skin. While a balance of biosynthesis and breakdown is essential for healthy skin, as we age, the balance is shifted toward excessive breakdown and harmful biochemical changes.
The application to the skin of retinol (normal vitamin A - also called vitamin A alcohol) or retinoic acid (vitamin A acid) helps restore a more normal (younger) balance between the skin's structural protein biosynthesis and breakdown, and also keeps a normal balance between healthy and dying skin cells. The applied vitamin A binds to receptors in the skin which then transfer genetic instructions from DNA to the cell's protein producing machinery which restores the characteristic proteins needed for healthy skin cells.
Creams with Retinol, in general, work very well for people over age 45. Retinol can cause increased acne in person from 18 to 25. Paradoxically, retinol creams can often stop severe chronic cystic acne in some people between 25 and 40. When using retinol creams it is best to start slow and work up to increased amounts of cream.
 

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Oh yes...and can you remember the difference between Vitamin A and Vitamin A derived from Beta Carotene? I know that Beta Carotene source of Vitamin A is NOT a retinyl palminate. Can you enlighten us on what the difference is and why the Beta Carotine is safer? Or maybe 'safer' was the wrong wording....provides 'different' benefits? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh yes...and can you remember the difference between Vitamin A and Vitamin A derived from Beta Carotene? I know that Beta Carotene source of Vitamin A is NOT a retinyl palminate. Can you enlighten us on what the difference is and why the Beta Carotine is safer? Or maybe 'safer' was the wrong wording....provides 'different' benefits? Thanks.
I have something - will have to look for it. I kept my files in two different places.
 

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Oh yes...and can you remember the difference between Vitamin A and Vitamin A derived from Beta Carotene? I know that Beta Carotene source of Vitamin A is NOT a retinyl palminate. Can you enlighten us on what the difference is and why the Beta Carotine is safer? Or maybe 'safer' was the wrong wording....provides 'different' benefits? Thanks.
Stumped! yup I am. I'm not sure as both have benefits. I know with Beta Carotene you can get an orange tone to your skin if TOO much is used. Don't think that happens with the retinyl palmitate. I know Arbonne uses both in their products as they both have benefits. As to what the differences are in those benefits, I'm not sure and I'd have to research that!
 

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Stumped! yup I am. I'm not sure as both have benefits. I know with Beta Carotene you can get an orange tone to your skin if TOO much is used. Don't think that happens with the retinyl palmitate. I know Arbonne uses both in their products as they both have benefits. As to what the differences are in those benefits, I'm not sure and I'd have to research that!
No way....huh, stumped - just kidding! I remember the Beta Carotene derived Vitamin A they use in their acne supplement because we all know too much Vitamin A can have not so great effects too....but can't remember the difference between the 2. Don't make me go take that course over again - LOL! I'm kidding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No way....huh, stumped - just kidding! I remember the Beta Carotene derived Vitamin A they use in their acne supplement because we all know too much Vitamin A can have not so great effects too....but can't remember the difference between the 2. Don't make me go take that course over again - LOL! I'm kidding.
I know I should redo the courses! Yes the Beta Carotene is good for acne and like you - I can't remember the differences between the two A's but the other is in more of the anti-aging lines.
 

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Also, retinyl palmitate is weaker than retinol. There's another, more effective retinoid on the market called retinaldehyde (retinal). What is great with retinaldehyde (RAL) is that retinol has to break down in the skin first into RAL, then into retinoic acid/tretinoin. With RAL you by-pass the first step. It's also less irritating than retinol.
 
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