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Discussion Starter #1
I will spare you the long story.
The picture attached is pretty much how my face looks now.

It is fairly dark. I have used the following products.
Palmer's Skin Success - Even Tone Fade Cream
Fred Palmer's - Skin Whitener
MenScience - Pigmentation Repair Formula
And one other that actually did a lot of damage to my skin(I forget the name).

Basically, Palmers works slightly but leaves my skin very red instead of dark.
Fred Palmer's is pretty much the same. Not as strong as Palmer's Skin Success. And MenScience, the most expensive one($50+) is pretty much like me spitting on my hand and rubbing it on my face. No affect at all.

Now i am on to Derma e Skin Lighten.

I don't know what to do now. I am a male so I can't really hide it with makeup. I cannot find a product that will work effectively.
 

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hi. upon reading your post, i noticed that the first 3 product that you used contains Hydroquinone. you should impose great precaution while using this kind of ingredient as it will burn your skin if you are not using Adequate sun protection......
Derma E skin lighten is effective for some people, not effective for everyone because it only contains Vit C, REtinyl Palminate(A weak form of Vit a) and Licorice as whitening ingredients. i think this one requires continous use to take effect.
for the meantime, using sunblock is a must to prevent further damage to your skin..
hope this help
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply!

Yea, I want to avoid Hydroquinone if possible.
But I think I am alergic to Kojic acid... the product I used that did A LOT of damage to my skin was based on kojic acid.

I am just not sure where to go at this point. I suppose the thread listing the lighteners would be a good place to start. I don't really care how much the product cost, as long as its reasonable ($0 - $100+)
 

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can you post the ingredients of the product that you said you are allergic to?
anyway, aside from kojic, there are alternative actives like licorice, ARBUTIN,vitamin C and A and lactic acid .....there are good products out there. you just need to research a lot.
 

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skin bleaching/ lightening & its dangers
Added: (Mon Sep 26 2005)
DANGERS OF SKIN LIGHTENING


Would you use a cream or soap that may have the following long term side effects ?
skin cancer, liver damage, kidney damage or poisoning?


In the modern appearance conscious society in which we live there is a myth that lighter paler complexions portray beauty, riches and success.


This misguided belief has resulted in a huge market in the UK of skin lightening products. Some people use them secretly knowing what the side effects are, others using poorly labelled under the counter products not knowing what dangers they are letting themselves in for. Manufacturers may not be fully versed with the side effects or labelling may be misleading or economical with the truth.


Why do we have colour in our skin?

There are three reasons for the colour of our skin:

o The cells contained within the dermis and epidermis provide a natural yellow, white colour

o Superficial blood vessels provide a blue or red tint determined by oxygen content

o Melanin produced by melanocytes scattered within the basal layer of the skin


It is this third point which determines how dark a persons skin is; more melanin production results in darker skin. Melanin has another key function - it plays a major protective role. It is the skins own natural protection from the harmful ultra violet rays of the sun. Without it the skin is extremely vulnerable and we would have to cover exposed skins with sun screen or risk a greater chance of developing skin cancer.


How skin lightening products work

There are two chemicals found in skin lightening products, Hydroquinone or Mercury.


o Hydroquinone (C6H6O2) is a severely toxic and very powerful chemical used in photo processing, the manufacture of rubber and is an active agent in hair dyes.


o Mercury in the form of Mercury Chloride & Ammoniated Mercury is carcinogenic. They appear on the list of toxic substances that can only be purchased via pharmacies with prescribed labels of toxicity.


Both products perform a similar process. In the short term they will initially cause the skin to lighten by inhibiting the production of melanin. Without melanin formation in the basal layer no brown pigmentation will be visible.


The long term effects, however, are those that must be addressed.



The long term effects of using skin lightening products

Hydroquinone or Mercury applied to the skin will react with ultra violet rays and re-oxidise, leading to more pigmentation and premature ageing. More product is then applied in an attempt to correct the darker blotchy appearance.


These are the beginnings of a vicious cycle. By altering the skins natural structure and inhibiting the production of Melanin, it?s natural protection, the skin is more susceptible to skin cancer.


Prolonged use of Hydroquinone will thicken collegen fibres damaging the connective tissues. The result is rough blotchy skin leaving it with a spotty cavier appearance.


Mercury will slowly accumulate within the skin cells striping the skin of it?s natural pigment leaving behind the tell tale signs of gray/ blue pigmentation in the folds of the skin. In the long term the chemical will damage vital organs and lead to liver and kidney failure and mercury poisoning.


Are these products legal?

Products containing up to 2 percent Hydroquinone were legally available in the UK until 2001 when the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) issued the draft 24th Commission Directive. This bans preparations with Hydroquinone due to the long term effects as it accumulates in the tissues. The UK Cosmetic Product Regulations 1978 prohibits the use of Mercury compounds.


However, the demand for theses products is so high that there are illegal imports via small operators from Asia and Africa of creams, lotions and soaps of up to 6 percent which are sold under the counter in the UK.
Graham McPherson from Trading Standards said ?we regularly find consignments varying from a couple of hundred items to a couple of thousand items on a monthly basis.?


Second generation of skin lightening products

Sujata Kashap, a skin care specialist, has been investigating a new highly toxic chemical that is already hitting the shops. Sujata said ?even if hydroquinone and mercury products are successfully banned in the UK there is be a second generation of products containing Kajoic Acid that also work by inhibiting melanin production. Which means that in 5 years time we will be back in the same situation.?


We need to stop this ?disease? from spreading

For many years beauty has been associated with being fair. Models are as white as possible and people are commended on the fairness of their skin. We feel that we must bow down to the social pressures or we suffer from the psychological effects which cause us to use products which may permanently disfigure or cause horrific side effects.


Banning products containing Hydroquinone and Mercury will not stop the products from entering the UK and being sold under the counter. The only way we can make a positive impact on preventing this ?disease? from spreading is through continuous campaigns raising awareness via the media and the government.


- ENDS -

This is a government publication, it's very reliable.
Best of luck in making your decision but remember there are very serious disadvantages. I think your beautiful dark, i know many women love darker skinned men - like me. As they appear to be more manly and caring.
Please don't damage your skin anymore!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
can you post the ingredients of the product that you said you are allergic to?
anyway, aside from kojic, there are alternative actives like licorice, ARBUTIN,vitamin C and A and lactic acid .....there are good products out there. you just need to research a lot.
I don't have it anymore and I don't even remember the name of it.

If I saw it, i would know but I don't even see it in stores anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think I found the product that did further damage to my skin.
Moore Unique
Ruined (some of) my life...

Anyways, I have this Fair and Flawless Super Spot Remove I have been using on and off for about a year. It is too strong. I can use it on monday night, leave it on for either 10-15 minutes or overnight and by tuesday morning, the areas I put the cream on are peeling. Its not just a little peeling either... its leave your skin raw type of peeling. Then I can use it again until it heals somewhat to start the cycle over and over again. If I dilute it with lotion, it seems to have very little affect. So that is 50 bucks down the drain.

I have this 'Skin Lighten' by dermaE as well. its one of those "all natural" creams. Been using it on and off for a while. It doesn't seem to do anything after about a week or so so I just stop using it.

Any other suggestions? Anything?
 

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xt | PDF (118 K)

The widespread use of skin lightening creams in Senegal: a persistent public health problem in West Africa.

Report
International Journal of Dermatology. 41(2):69-72, February 2002.
del Giudice, Pascal MD; Yves, Pinier MD

Abstract:
Background: The use of skin lightening creams is common in the female population of some African countries. The long-term use of certain products for several months to years may cause cutaneous adverse effects.

Methods: From 1992 to 1993, we conducted an epidemiologic and clinical study in Dakar, Senegal. Women were questioned about the use of skin lightening creams and examined for potential adverse skin reactions. Six hundred and eighty-five Senegalese women participated in the study.

Results: Twenty-six per cent of women were using skin lightening creams at the time and 36% had used them at some time. The most common products used were hydroquinone and corticosteroids, but 25% of women had used products of unknown composition. Seventy-five per cent of women using such creams showed cutaneous adverse effects. Facial acne was the most common adverse effect.

Conclusions: A major part of the female adult population of Senegal used skin lightening creams. The long-term use of these creams is responsible for a high rate of cutaneous adverse effects. This practice has also been reported in other countries from sub-Saharan Africa and suggests a widespread use in the African population.

(C) 2002 Blackwell Science Ltd.

Read the above carefully & note that relatively few women, even under these circumstances experienced negative effects. 25% were using a product whose ingredients were unknown. Of these women, 75% experienced adverse effects. The most common effect was acne (NOT cancer or something truly disfiguring).
 

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I lived in Thailand and all the women used tretinoin and hydroquinone and anything to lighten their skin. They were desperate to be lighter. It is like the old fashion Victorian pre-Coco Channel days. It used to be that being in the sun was a sign of manual labor and as such it still is so in many countries, especially developing countries. I kind of like it as being tan is so valued in USA even if it is bad for you. It is like anyone "young" does have a healthy glow (even if it is not healthy) so youth is associated with tan eventhough people deny it, at least where I live. On the other hand---it is the opposite in Thailand.

One way to lighten your skin naturally is if you are dark from sun-exposure to use pure tretinoin. I was using it and you can buy it without a prescription on Netmedorders.com it is legal and US based--but now I have a prescription for tri-luma which has tretinoin and hydroquinone, it is very irritating despite also having a steroid to presumably mitigate the irritation. I will not be using a second tube at 175 dollars a 30g tube! I will go back to tretinoin on my face after this tube is gone.
 

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Lexi 2009,

You're paying waaay too much. Even at the source you listed. I am using tretinoin 0.1% & I pay a fraction of that amt. How was the tri-luma?
 
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