Skin Care Talk banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Skincare Central-All About Sunscreens
says: *shortened from above link*
Important Facts About Sun Protection and Sunscreens

Sun protection is one of the single most important things you can do to prevent and even reverse photo-aging of the skin. Some studies show that as much as 80% of what we refer to as "skin aging" is actually photoaging due to cumulative sun exposure, and is not due to the intrinsic, or chronological, aging process. Some people mistakenly believe that they can escape photoaging (and even skin cancer) by simply avoiding the beach, but, in fact, repeated daily incidental exposure may acfually account for as much as 80% of a person's total lifetime UV exposure! And an estimated 2 in every 5 Americans who reaches the age of 65 will develop skin cancer sometime in their lives.

The SPF rating system does not accurately or completely define a sunscreen's protective capabilities from any other harmful ultraviolet radiation, except the UVB wavelength. Thus, when evaluating sunscreens, it is critical to determine the PPD rating as well. PPD is the rating used to determine a sunscreen's UVA rays capabilities. Basically, PPD is to UVA rays what SPF is the UVB rays. Thus, a good sunscreen should provide a PPD of at least 15, which would block about 95% of the UVA rays from your skin. Those with pigment problems or photosenstive conditions should choose sunscreens with even higher PPD ratings.

Choosing an Effective Sunscreen
Remember that "broad spectrum" is a baically meaningless term because it does not tell you much of the UVA rays are actually being blocked. Similarly, the SPF rating system does not predict the ability of sunscreens to block UVA wavelengths. In order to protect yourself from UVA rays, it is necessary to look to the PPD rating of a sunscreen. This will only be found on European (and some Canadian) sunscreens. Skincare Central only carries European sunscreens with the highest PPD protection available.

No U.S. sunscreen provides the UVA protection availble from European brand sunscreens such as Bioderma and La Roche Posay. This can be quickly determined by referring to the CIBA Sunscreen Simulator. Moreover, U.S. sunscreens often use chemicals that are not entirely safe. For example, Oxybenzone, a common sunscreen filter used to block short UVA rays, is systemically absorbed and excreted in urine at a much higher rate than other sunscreen filters. Some researchers have even concluded that oxybenzone should not be applied to large surface areas of the skin for extended and/or repeated periods of time. The high systemic absorption of oxybenzone may be of concern since some studies have shown that oxybenzone is estrogenic. Concerns have also been expressed about the safety of 4-MBC, which is used heavily in Canadian sunscreens but is highly estrogenic.
Here are a few tips for sunscreen application:
*Experiment with which actives will work well underneath your sunscreen. Some actives with a lot of hyaluronic acid in them may cause the sunscreen to "ball up." I find the 25% Vitamin C serum is great underneath my sunscreen and causes no problems. If your skincare serums cause balling, just use them at night instead.
*Try mixing a bit of a tinted sunscreen with your regular sunscreen if you find it tends to leave a white cast
*Apply to one area of your face at a time and blend in well.
*Give the sunscreen a few minutes to dry if necessary.
*Use the palms of your hands to pat down your face after applying sunscreen. Do NOT use oil blotting paper as you will remove the active sunscreen ingredients!
*Do NOT apply makeup that contains physical sunscreen (TIO2 or ZIO2) as an active ingredient as these will inactive the Avobenzone in your European sunscreen.
*Most powders will mattify your sunscreen quite nicely. You may find a loose powder works better.


Do I Need to Reapply?
That depends on your sun exposure. If you are going to be outside in intense exposure, then you should apply every 2 hours or anytime the sunscreen is sweated or washed off, such as during vigorous physical activity or swimming.

For everyday incidental exposure, you do not usually have to reapply every 2 hours. In fact, women who wear makeup would find this an impossible feat.! However, you must understand that your sunscreen WILL become less effective as time goes by., although it is not necessarily as grim as some would like to think. In one study, researchers tested the amount of sunscreen left on subjects' fingers after several hours. One sunscreen had 80% remaining after 4 hours, while the worst-performing sunscreen still had 78% remaining after 5 hours. So, a significant amount of the sunscreens were still there in both cases.

In another study, it was found that a water resistant sunscreen retained its SPF for 6 hours after application to the lower back. The worst case scenario was a non-waterproof sunscreen, which had an original tested SPF of 16.7 +/- 1.2 and, after 8 hours, was found to have an spf of 12.7 +/- 3.1. This is a loss of only SPF 4. So, while there is clearly a loss in sunscreen efficacy after several hous, I personally feel it is safe to say that most of your sunscreen will still be on your face for several hours after you apply it. But again, this is another reason why it is important to choose the highest possible protection to begin with.

So when do you reapply on a normal day? For most people, I would recommend applying as part of your normal A.M. daily skin routine. Then apply again later again in the day, perhaps after you get home from work. This way, you could actually wash your face and reapply. Reapplying in this manner will be especially important in the summer, where is stays light until almost 9 o'clock. Your sunscreen is simply not going to give you the necessary protection when it's been on your face for over 10 hours. Some people are able to repply sunscreens at lunchtime. If your schedule permits and it's possible for you, that's great!

During the winter, when it might be dark by 5 o'clock, you may not need to reapply at all. Again, the choice is yours based on your own risk/benefit analysis and the climate you live in. If you live in Florida, you might decide you need to reapply at lunch, however inconvenient it is, while someone living in Ohio might decide to forego the afternoon application, especially in the wintertime.

I always highly recommend tinting your car windows. It costs about $110 and is well worth the money! The intense, direct UVA rays encountered while driving an be entirely avoided with this simple procedure.


Do I Have to Wear Sunscreen in the House?
Well, you don't HAVE to do anything, but you really should wear sunscreen in the house. Remember that 90% of the aging UVA rays penetrate through glass. Any brightly lit room is flooded with aging UVA rays. If you simply apply your sunscreen as part of your morning routine, whether you're going anywhere or not, you'll always be protected and it won't feel like any big deal at all.

If the thought of wearing sunscreen in the house is simply too much to bear, there are some measures your can take. If you have blinds, turn them so the light is directed up towards the ceiling. At least you'll be avoiding direct light. If you are in a room and sitting directly next to a window, then close the curtains or blinds to avoid that direct light from blasting right on you.

And of course, you can always tint your house. Lots of poeple do this in some part of the country just to cut down on energy bills.Those that do this always tell me they appreciate the freedom not to have to wear sunscreen in the house. But that means you also have to remember to put it on if you go outside to check the mail or just go sit in the backyard. So in the end, it's probably just as easy to simply apply your sunscreen in the morning and not worry about it.

Which Sunscreen Is Right for Me?
Clearly, the European sunscreens are superior in UVA protection and should be chosen whenever possible. The cost of these, as well as having to import them from Europe, has been a deterrent to some, but I truly believe the cost and inconvenience is far outweighed by the anti-aging benefits. Moreover, at Skincare Central, we've taken all the hassle out of obtaining these excellent sunscreens by importing them for you! We've also chosen only those formulas which offer exceptional UVA protection AND superior texture and finish.

However, some people cannot tolerate chemical sunscreens or simply wish to avoid them. There are a few U.S. sunscreens that will provide decent protection and are completely natural. One is our 100% Pure Titanium by Professional Solutions. This sunscreen contains only titanium dioxide and water. It is exceptionally light and can be applied straight to the face with your fingertips. Applied straight, this sunscreen will provide a PPD of approximately 8 if two layers are applied, which is easy to do with this light product. Two layers of this product means a normal "layer" of product as most people would apply it. It does not mean you have to apply 1/2 teaspoon to your face!

Won't Oral Anti-Oxidants Help Prevent UV Damage to my Skin?
Absolutely and I highly encourage them! Good ones to take include Vitamins C, E and beta carotene. Other excellent free-radical fighters include Alpha Lipoic Acid, CoQ10, selenium, fish oil, and a new, but very effective supplement called Polypodium leucotomos, or "Kalawalla." The latter has been proven in Harvard studies to effectively neturalize UV free-radicals

Oral supplements can't replace your sunscreen, but they certainly help "fill in the gaps" caused by not reapplying enough, not applying enough in the first place, etc. Think of it as extra insurance against UV damage to your skin..



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
Great post Fawnie. I see WAY too often on this site as well as other similar sites where people are so fixated on the latest, greatest, next cant miss super duper magic skin product. When in reality a proper photostabile sunscreen is the NUMBER 1 item to be using if protecting your skin from aging is important to you.
One thing I dont really agree on in that article is the part about applying your sunscreen a second time when you get home. That's pretty silly as almost no one would do that. Most people get home after 5:00pm or so when the uv rays are not a real issue. Especially using blinds, etc.
Great idea about tinting your car windows. The front glass on most modern windows is lamenated and this will block the majority of uv rays.

http://www.smartskincare.com/skinpro...v-indoors.html
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, 5pm would be silly for reapplication. What makes me paranoid now is the radiation from the computer screen, since that's where I spend my days in the winter. Does sunscreen protect against that type of radiation???



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,074 Posts
One thing I dont really agree on in that article is the part about applying your sunscreen a second time when you get home. Thats' pretty silly as almost no one would do that. Most people get home after 5:00pm or so when the uv rays are not a real issue. Especially using blinds, etc.
This makes sense to me too. And most days I work at home so I do not apply sunscreen at all - I'm not seated anywhere near a window. But I've noticed a slight burn on my face at times, and I've wondered if it is due to the weird light fixture that I'm sitting under.

Have you read whether some sources of artificial light should also be avoided? It seems that somewhere I read something that flourescent lights were problematic - but cannot remember where I saw it or any of the details.

(I haven't had a chance to read through all the links that Fawnie and Peri just posted, so I apologize if the answer is in them - I will get to them later).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Mireckca - Yes, Peri's link and mine say that UVA rays can be transmitted thru glass, and that fluorescent light is also a culprit.

What bothers me is the radiation from the computer screen....I'm trying to find some info about that....anyone have any?



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
Mireckca - Yes, Peri's link and mine say that UVA rays can be transmitted thru glass, and that fluorescent light is also a culprit.

What bothers me is the radiation from the computer screen....I'm trying to find some info about that....anyone have any?
Searching the net I came up with this: LCD screens emit less electromagnetic radiation
than CRT screens. I have been using a radiation filter screen on my monitor for a few years now. I'm assuming it's blocking those nasty uv rays. At least I hope so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
Gr8 post, Fawnie. very helpful. I have certainly learnt a bit more about sunscreen now

I am using a non-greasy herbal sunblock cream for the mo, and it says waterproof on the label. Does it mean it won't come off even after sweating or washing with only water??
Thanks
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Gr8 post, Fawnie. very helpful. I have certainly learnt a bit more about sunscreen now

I am using a non-greasy herbal sunblock cream for the mo, and it says waterproof on the label. Does it mean it won't come off even after sweating or washing with only water??
Thanks
Usually it just means water-resistant. I would still reapply it if you've been in the water a while and are going to stay outside.

In addition, with a water-resistant sunscreen, and with any of the Euro or Japanese sunscreens, you should remove with an oil cleanser, like DHC Deep Oil Cleanser or Fancl. Regular soap will not remove it.



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
Usually it just means water-resistant. I would still reapply it if you've been in the water a while and are going to stay outside.

In addition, with a water-resistant sunscreen, and with any of the Euro or Japanese sunscreens, you should remove with an oil cleanser, like DHC Deep Oil Cleanser or Fancl. Regular soap will not remove it.
Thanks for helpful explanation, Fawnie. I really appreciate it.

For the mo, I am using facial cleansing wipes for removing sunblock and used the oil cleansing method a couple of times too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Hey fawnie thanks for link very interesting however at the mo im using the la roche posay sun screen however this does leave my face very white looking are all the 50 per cent sun screen lotions going to be like this or is there better one i can use that wont leave my face as white as a ghost! Thankyou for da help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
My sunblock leaves my skin whitish too! Takes a while to absorb! But when I wear my make-up, it doesn't show that much!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
the la roche one is really thick people am thinking im a ghost or there is something wrong with me at work! Im not gonna tell um im anti aging they will think im crazy, which they already do! Oh well i was thinking about getting spray on one but not sure if this will as good as actual cream! Im not a make up wearer as sure you know by now dont like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
Try to apply a tiny amt of sunscreen evenly all over face. Maybe this should help! Oh yes! I remember you don't like wearing make-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
However you should not really do this as unless its quite thick from what i know wont sink into skin properly! I dont know though just what i heard! Oh well
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
33,050 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Avene Emulsion SPF50+ is a high protection sunscreen that will not leave a white cast. You do have to wait a minute for it to absorb, but then it becomes invisible. It isn't greasy and can be used under makeup nicely!

It should be widely available in Europe!

LRP Anthelios XL isn't white but I found it's too greasy to use under makeup.



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Thanks fawnie i have not heard of this product before but il see if i can get hold of it at the chemists!
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top