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I've never really cared about my acne problems, but they're persistent so I might as well do something about them, you know?

History:
I have VERY oily skin. It's oily when I wake up, I use some sort of scrub or face pad and it's oily again within a few hours. I wash my face often as a result.
However, it never seems to get better.

I've tried:
Proactive, Oxy daily pads, St. Ives apricot scrub for blemishes, and most recently I've switched to Clean and Clear's Continuous scrub.

So, I'd like to know what a good regiment of products would be. I'm ready to try anything.
So, would kinds of products should I be using? How often? Which products would you all suggest for oily skins?

Thank you all very much
 

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Besides daily cleansing, you can exfoliate with a gentle scrub as necessary to remove dead surface skin cells. But daily exfoliating is generally not advised for oily skin because rough scrubbing can stimulate the oil glands; several times per week is usually sufficient. A deep cleansing mask (clay) used once per week can help to control oil beneath the surface of the skin. Also if you apply a moisturizer try finding an "oil free" one.

Finding a drying soap is not a problem (finding one that won't dry the skin can be). Look for a more specialized degreasing soaps like Cuticura Mildly Medicated Soap, Clearasil soap, or Neutrogena Oily Skin Formula. I have used the Cuticura and liked it very much. I have never tried the Neutrogena but I know lots who like it.

One last little bit- try using a toner. It can be one little step like using a toner, that will make a huge difference in your skin-
 

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Definitely 86 the St Ives Apricot Scrub - way too harsh and rough for anyone's skin but rhinos.
I admit that I have some of this scrub too - from before I became concerned with doing the right thing to my skin. I used it the other day just for the heck of it and did find it too harsh. And it didn't taste half as good as the brown sugar and olive oil mixture that I have replaced it with (I still get this stuff all over the place when I use it - outside and inside of me).
 

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Hi, how abt using facial blotters during the day to blot the excess oil? They're really handy for keeping your face matte when it's not convenient to wash your face during the day.
 

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You are going to think I'm crazy, but you seriously need a lightweight moisturizer. Also, cut down your face washing to 2 x a day, once in the AM, once in the PM

Here's the deal:
Your skin is covered by a layer of oil called a lipid barrier. On healthy skin, this lipid barrier is lightweight. It gives your skin its healthy "glow" and its soft look. The oil producing glands in your skin are called your "sebaceous glands," and the "oil" on your face is technically called "sebum."

The sebum does more than just moisturize your face. Sebum, forming that lipid barrier, protects your skin from the elements. Your skin NEEDS that layer in order to stay free of infection, and to prevent breakdown of your skin from pollutants in the air (and even in the things we consume). When you wash your face, you break down this lipid barrier.

This is great for you, so you think, because now you don't feel oily. Your skin's response to being without its protection, however, is to produce more oil, and quickly! This is a vital function, it is part of your skins characteristics as an organ.

The best way to prevent oil from building up on your face is NOT just to dry it out, but to balance it. Look for products containing seaweed - specifically a seaweed called bladderwrack - because this seaweed helps your skin's moisture content to be more balanced.

Use a toner - specifically one with glycerin. Glycerin is a humectant, which means it helps your skin hold and attract moisture. using a toner before using a good (but lightweight - perhaps gel-based and mattifying) moisturizer will help your skin get the most benefit from the moisturizer without becoming too greasy. If you protect your skin, it does not need to come to its own defense with way-too-much moisture.

Use blotting tissues to absorb excess oil throughout the day, but use them carefully. Press the tissue to your skin, then lift. Do not, by any means, rub or wipe them on your face. when you do that you are actually smearing dirt, oil, and bacteria across your pores. That is no picnic for your skin.

So, to recap. wash when you wake and before bed. tone and moisturize immediately following washing. 2-3 times a week, AFTER washing and BEFORE toning, use a facial scrub to eliminate dead skin cells that can clog your pores. Please use something with natural scrubbers (crushed walnut shell, coconut shell, sugar, oats, or even sand) and NOT with all those little polyethylene beads. We seriously do NOT need all that tiny plastic going down the drain.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You are going to think I'm crazy, but you seriously need a lightweight moisturizer. Also, cut down your face washing to 2 x a day, once in the AM, once in the PM

Here's the deal:
Your skin is covered by a layer of oil called a lipid barrier. On healthy skin, this lipid barrier is lightweight. It gives your skin its healthy "glow" and its soft look. The oil producing glands in your skin are called your "sebaceous glands," and the "oil" on your face is technically called "sebum."

The sebum does more than just moisturize your face. Sebum, forming that lipid barrier, protects your skin from the elements. Your skin NEEDS that layer in order to stay free of infection, and to prevent breakdown of your skin from pollutants in the air (and even in the things we consume). When you wash your face, you break down this lipid barrier.

This is great for you, so you think, because now you don't feel oily. Your skin's response to being without its protection, however, is to produce more oil, and quickly! This is a vital function, it is part of your skins characteristics as an organ.

The best way to prevent oil from building up on your face is NOT just to dry it out, but to balance it. Look for products containing seaweed - specifically a seaweed called bladderwrack - because this seaweed helps your skin's moisture content to be more balanced.

Use a toner - specifically one with glycerin. Glycerin is a humectant, which means it helps your skin hold and attract moisture. using a toner before using a good (but lightweight - perhaps gel-based and mattifying) moisturizer will help your skin get the most benefit from the moisturizer without becoming too greasy. If you protect your skin, it does not need to come to its own defense with way-too-much moisture.

Use blotting tissues to absorb excess oil throughout the day, but use them carefully. Press the tissue to your skin, then lift. Do not, by any means, rub or wipe them on your face. when you do that you are actually smearing dirt, oil, and bacteria across your pores. That is no picnic for your skin.

So, to recap. wash when you wake and before bed. tone and moisturize immediately following washing. 2-3 times a week, AFTER washing and BEFORE toning, use a facial scrub to eliminate dead skin cells that can clog your pores. Please use something with natural scrubbers (crushed walnut shell, coconut shell, sugar, oats, or even sand) and NOT with all those little polyethylene beads. We seriously do NOT need all that tiny plastic going down the drain.
Do you have any specific products you can recommend? I'm very new to this and when I look in the skin care aisle at the store I can't make heads or tails of what is what. Also, I'm on a limited budget, being young, so the cheaper the better. Though I'm willing to go out of my price range a bit
 

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Bee,
What do you think of manuka honey for acne? Have you seen results?
I haven't tried it and I don't know anyone who has, so I really can't say for sure. I know that manuka is really good for troubled scalps (the body shop used to sell a manuka shampoo for troubled scalps that had rave reviews from its customers), and some of the characteristics of acne and troubled scalps are the same, so it makes sense that it would work
 

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Do you have any specific products you can recommend? I'm very new to this and when I look in the skin care aisle at the store I can't make heads or tails of what is what. Also, I'm on a limited budget, being young, so the cheaper the better. Though I'm willing to go out of my price range a bit
I'm sorry it took me so long to respond, it's been a crazy week!

Except for my own skin care products (which are primarily body right now, the only facial product I've made is a toner for sensitive skin that is also acne prone), I'm pretty addicted to the body shop. Reason being: Their products are naturally based, they are less expensive than Aveda and Origins, and they work very well.

I'm a big fan of blended skin care regimens. For example, for your face wash I would really recommend something natural that contains tea tree oil. The Body Shop's "Foaming Tea Tree" facewash is great, because it is harder to waste / goes a lot farther because of the foam-pump. Their regular tea tree cleanser is good, too. Their Tea Tree Toner (or Freshener, depending on what region you live in the label may be different) is a great follow up to the cleanser. As a moisturizer, though, you will want something that will keep your moisture level balanced. I would pick their Seaweed Mattifying Moisturizer, and the Seaweed clarifying night treatment. Obviously, you use the night treatment at night, and the mattifying cream in the morning.

For blotting tissues, anything will work, really, Something that is tea tree or lavender based, though, will be mildly antiseptic, which is great because instead of just removing the excess oil from your skin, you'll be killing pesky pimple causing bacteria, too!
 
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