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How long is the effectiveness of Retin-A? For example, will I be able to use Retin-A for 1 year and still receive the same benefits since day one? Or will my skin start to adapt to the Retin-A it will on longer be effective.
Thanks!!
 

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So it's good to use Retin-A for a few months.. off for a few months and get back on it? What's a good routine for using Retin-A to achiece it's most effectiveness? Thanks!
 

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I haven't used Retin-A before, thank god I haven't needed it, BUT I will provide this advice. Acne is caused by the bacteria p.acnes right? Retin-A is used to attack this bacteria, as with human, bacteria will adapt to stresses around it to the point that it could become resistant. This is merely a theory and I admit I could be way off, but you wouldn't want to give the bacteria a change to develop a resistance to the drug. I would go with 4 weeks on 2 weeks off and back and forth. Your dermatologist or doctor may recommend something else. You could also eyeball it and see how your skin reacts to it. I hear that **** is really strong, so you might only be able to do a week on followed with a week off depending on your skins ability to handle the drug.
 

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The Retin-A doesn't attack bacteria, it changes how your skin works. Retin A is the acid form of vitamin A, known as tretinoin. It greatly increases cellular turnover and decreases your oil production. So, the comedons (the plugs that are made up of oil and dead skin cells) that clog your pores are pushed out and the bacteria have less food. In mild forms you can use these products continuously, and you really only see consistent results if you do so, but there are side effects. You shouldn't ever wax skin that you are currently treating with Retin-A; you must be very careful with harsh exfoliation (a rough cloth or like Freddy suggests in another post, a scrub with "beads"); and you are at much much greater risk of extreme sunburn and sun damage. You can easily avoid that with the sunscreen you should be wearing everyday anyway. You can find vitamin A in quite a few products in different forms, Retin-A is the acid form and is also sometimes listed as retinoic acid or All trans retinoic acid, but there are other forms of vitamin A out there. Does this help?
 

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The Retin-A doesn't attack bacteria, it changes how your skin works. Retin A is the acid form of vitamin A, known as tretinoin. It greatly increases cellular turnover and decreases your oil production. So, the comedons (the plugs that are made up of oil and dead skin cells) that clog your pores are pushed out and the bacteria have less food. In mild forms you can use these products continuously, and you really only see consistent results if you do so, but there are side effects. You shouldn't ever wax skin that you are currently treating with Retin-A; you must be very careful with harsh exfoliation (a rough cloth or like Freddy suggests in another post, a scrub with "beads"); and you are at much much greater risk of extreme sunburn and sun damage. You can easily avoid that with the sunscreen you should be wearing everyday anyway. You can find vitamin A in quite a few products in different forms, Retin-A is the acid form and is also sometimes listed as retinoic acid or All trans retinoic acid, but there are other forms of vitamin A out there. Does this help?

Sorry I don't agree with you. The problem with so many acne treatment is that they focus solely on trying to kill billions and trillions of bacteria. We are not even talking about millions here. It is not possible to eliminate all the bacteria that would cause acne. Instead, we should direct more efforts on controlling sebum's production.


Anyway, that's my opinion
 

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Thank you for the information. I will continue to use Retin-A and take the proper precautions. I have another question... I have a superficial scar (1 inch) on my cheek from playing basketball. Will the Retin-A help fade it? I also have 10% glycolic pads.. Can I use the pads and Retin-A simultaneously? I want to maximize exfoliation... I heard that was my best bet for fading scars? Thanks!!
 

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I wouldn't.. Using retin A has been known to cause the skin to thin a bit for some people. I would actually recommend avoiding exfoliation except for maybe once a week, and only with something very gentle. Too much exfoliation places a lot of stress on the skin and if you do too much, your skin can become very painful (scabbing in extreme cases). Go get a product for scars, I've heard maderma(sp?) is pretty good, and I definately recommend Demarkable (its made by the company I work for), but ultimately the best results come from cosmetic surgery.
"I have a superficial scar (1 inch) on my cheek from playing basketball.
You certainly play for keeps
 

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I have been using Retin-A 0.05% for a year now and my face has cleared out pretty well. The only problem is in that period of the month when I have some pimples. Sometimes are light but sometimes are those big things under the skin and they hurt. I was thinking if I switch to retin-A 0.1% would I have a chance of getting rid of all pimples?
 

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I have been using Retin-A 0.05% for a year now and my face has cleared out pretty well. The only problem is in that period of the month when I have some pimples. Sometimes are light but sometimes are those big things under the skin and they hurt. I was thinking if I switch to retin-A 0.1% would I have a chance of getting rid of all pimples?
except working on the outside, you need to work on the inside as well. To avoid big pimples under the skin, you need to have a good diet. I know sometimes it could be difficult to eat well but do try to eat plenty of vegs and fruits.
most important is to find out what kind of foods normally gives you break out or big pimples, some people get them when they eat Chocalate or dairy products, some peoples skin can't take spicy food and some got pimples coz of dairy products.

I found if i eat a lot of white starch or chocalate will gives me big pimples so i tried to avoid these food.

i used to have acne skin quit often until i started taken Flaxseed oil in my diet, my skin clear up and i don't have break out anymore.
Flaxseed is a powerful supplement for skin and body, you might want to give it a try!!
 

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I think my diet is healthy, I am eating cereals and milk every day, also fruits, I don't eat fried food, and I don't have problems with dairy products as I eat milk every day and I have pimples only around the days that I have my period. I also don't eat chocholate. I don't know if is possible to grow a resistance to retin-A, but I feel that my skin is not so smooth as it was after a few moths of using Retin-A.
 

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I have been using Retin A for 1 year, overall my skin has cleared up quite a bit, althought I still have minor acne, I eat vegetables, eat healthy, drink a fair amount of water, exercise about 5/7 days a week, and get most of my vitamins, but I can't seem to make it disappear, any tips?
 

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Hi Mario and welcome!

Can you give us a little background?
How old are you?
What products do you use?
Do you have any sensitivities to products?
What is your acne like?
Do you eat dairy and red meat?
Does anything make your skin flare up?
What makes it calm down?

Hope we can help!




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