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Does anyone use a sunblock with Mexoryl? It is the new ingredient in sunblocks that are sold overseas. It also just got FDA approval in the USA. I have heard good things about La Roche Posay brand.
 

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I haven't heard anything bad about it. I only know it's new to us not them over in Europe. I've heard they have all kinds of great stuff we haven't even heard of yet. Can't wait!!
 

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La Roche Posay is a really good brand/products. Had been living in Europe for the past three years and my partner used it who had very sensitive skin - it really worked. I'm now living in Toronto and they sell La Roche products at Shoppers Drug Mart in Canada Shoppers Drug Mart for all those in the US, Canada's a bit closer than Europe
 

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La Roche Posay is a really good brand/products. Had been living in Europe for the past three years and my partner used it who had very sensitive skin - it really worked. I'm now living in Toronto and they sell La Roche products at Shoppers Drug Mart in Canada Shoppers Drug Mart for all those in the US, Canada's a bit closer than Europe
Thank you Mike - will have to keep that link handy!
 

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Wow....thanks guys. I'm gonna have to check into that....me being so darn sensitive to certain things and sunscreen being one of them.
 

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I *love* Mexoryl! I don't get a reaction form it like I get from most other filters. Keep in mind it's only Mexoryl XS that's FDA approved, not the newer Mexoryl XL. Two totally different chemicals. The product that is approved also contains avobenzone and octocrylene. It's still worth checking out though, because it will have higher UVA protection than anything available in the US before.
 

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I love this site here - he has a lot of information about suntanning and what products/chemicals are safe or not! Apparently the jury isn't out on the avobenzone according to this site.

Avobenzone [butyl-methyoxydibenzoylmethane; Parsol 1789] - This is the only chemical sunscreen currently allowed by the European Community. However, its safety is still questionable since it easily penetrates the skin and is a strong free radical generator.

Avobenzone (Parsol 1789) May Not Be Safe Either

In 1997, Europe, Canada, and Australia changed sunscreens to use three specific active sunscreen ingredients - avobenzone (also known as Parsol 1789), titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide - as the basis of sunscreens. In the USA, the cosmetic companies have held off this policy as they try to sell off their stockpiles of cosmetics containing toxic sunscreens banned in other countries.

However, avobenzone is a powerful free radical generator and also should have been banned. Avobenzone is easily absorbed through the epidermis and is still a chemical that absorbs ultraviolet radiation energy. Since it cannot destroy this energy, it has to convert the light energy into chemical energy, which is normally released as free radicals. While it blocks long-wave UVA, it does not effectively UVB or short-wave UVA radiation, and is usually combined with other sunscreen chemicals to produce a "broad-spectrum" product. In sunlight, avobenzone degrades and becomes ineffective within about 1 hour.
 

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I love this site - he has a lot of information about suntanning and what products/chemicals are safe or not! Apparently the jury isn't out on the avobenzone according to this site.

Avobenzone [butyl-methyoxydibenzoylmethane; Parsol 1789] - This is the only chemical sunscreen currently allowed by the European Community. However, its safety is still questionable since it easily penetrates the skin and is a strong free radical generator.

Avobenzone (Parsol 1789) May Not Be Safe Either

In 1997, Europe, Canada, and Australia changed sunscreens to use three specific active sunscreen ingredients - avobenzone (also known as Parsol 1789), titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide - as the basis of sunscreens. In the USA, the cosmetic companies have held off this policy as they try to sell off their stockpiles of cosmetics containing toxic sunscreens banned in other countries.

However, avobenzone is a powerful free radical generator and also should have been banned. Avobenzone is easily absorbed through the epidermis and is still a chemical that absorbs ultraviolet radiation energy. Since it cannot destroy this energy, it has to convert the light energy into chemical energy, which is normally released as free radicals. While it blocks long-wave UVA, it does not effectively UVB or short-wave UVA radiation, and is usually combined with other sunscreen chemicals to produce a "broad-spectrum" product. In sunlight, avobenzone degrades and becomes ineffective within about 1 hour.
Interesting. Sunscreens are definitely a complicated topic. I know that octocrylene stabilizes avobenzone if used at a ratio of two to one. I *also* know that it makes my skin red, dry and irritated so I try to stay the heck away from it.
 

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I'm also sensitive to certain sunscreens and so is my daughter....darn it all....suppose to protect our skin from the sun, yet.....the protection we are looking for, can irritate if we don't know what we are looking for. ARGGG.
 
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