Skin Care Talk banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The Sunscreen Paradox
Popular Misconceptions About Skin Cancer Prevention

The Best Skin-Protecting Topical Ingredients
Exciting recent research shows that, in addition to broad-spectrum UV-A and UV-B blocking ingredients, natural topical ingredients can help protect skin against free radical-generated damage induced by UV light. Such natural agents may offer protection against photoaging, hyperpigmentation, and skin cancers.

• Green tea extract (epigallocatechin gallate, or EGCG). Deriving the health benefits of green tea is not limited to drinking it or taking it in the form of a high-potency extract. Topical administration likewise provides great benefits, including protecting against damage that can contribute to skin cancer and skin aging.

EGCG, a prime component of green tea, provides broad-spectrum protection against UV light-induced DNA damage and immune system dysfunction of the skin.24,25 Topical green tea extract is exceptional in preventing the inflammation and oxidative stress associated with UV light-induced skin damage.26-31 As a result, scientists believe green tea may help prevent skin cancers that commonly result from exposure to the sunâ€2122s radiation, this protection occurred even when green tea was applied following (not just before) UV light-induced damage. Thus, green tea may not only help prevent damage from UV rays, but also may help repair damage that has already occurred. Thus, green tea helps reverse two of the hallmarks of aging skin: reduced skin thickness and keratinocyte destruction. This suggests a central role for green tea in preventing skin aging and promoting youthful skin.


Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
• Rosemary extract (ursolic and carnosic acids). The aromatic herb rosemary, used for thousands of years as both a spice and medicinal agent, is particularly rich in carnosic and ursolic acids, two potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents. More than a decade ago, scientists found that carnosic and ursolic acids effectively prevent skin cancer in a validated model of human skin cancer carcinogenesis.34

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)
• Turmeric extract (tetrahydrocurcumin). Curcumin is fast becoming known as a cure-all nutrient, and for good reason. Derived from the pungent spice turmeric, curcumin has excellent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Curcumin inhibits cancer initiation and promotion in validated cancer models.39,40

Curcumin induces the powerful tumor suppressor gene p53 and promotes the death of basal cell skin cancer cells.41 Furthermore, research shows that curcumin can make mutant, treatment-resistant malignant melanoma cell lines more responsive to chemotherapy.42

While these and other studies suggest that topical curcumin may benefit the skin, the staining properties of its bright yellow native pigment have prevented its widespread use in topical products. Fortunately, a major metabolite of curcumin called tetrahydrocurcumin does not possess the staining characteristics of native curcumin.

Laboratory studies indicate that topical tetrahydrocurcumin is a safe and effective skin-lightening agent.44,45 Skin-lightening agents help fade sun-induced areas of hyperpigmentation, or skin darkening. Many such agents work by inhibiting tyrosinase, a key enzyme involved in melanin synthesis. Thus, the colorless turmeric root derivative tetra-hydrocurcumin may help protect the skin against the detrimental effects of UV light and may help prevent (or fade) hyperpigmented areas of skin.

• Milk thistle extract (silibinin). The milk thistle plant contains silibinin and silymarin, two compounds that are well known for their anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immune-enhancing properties in the context of liver disease. Less well known—but equally important—are the documented benefits of milk thistle extract against skin cancer.

Since milk thistle extract is well tolerated and acts in several ways to fight the cancer-causing effects of solar radiation, leading researchers believe it may be an ideal addition to sunscreen formulations.49


Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra)
• Licorice root. The medicinal properties of licorice root have been known since ancient Greece and Rome.50 A powerful skin protectant, licorice has anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting, and anti-cancer effects, including protecting against DNA damage.51 Licorice extract also has demonstrated efficacy in treating atopic dermatitis, an allergy-related, intensely itchy swelling of the skin.52

Glycyrrhizin, the main component of licorice root, protects against UV-B light-induced damage in the context of human melanoma cells.53 Glycyrrhetinic acid, another constituent of licorice, protects against skin tumor initiation and promotion in a validated model of skin cancer.54

An extract of licorice called glabridin reduces inflammation resulting from UV light exposure. In fact, when a licorice extract rich in glabridin was applied to the skin before exposure to UV light, it helped prevent the redness and pigmentation that would normally have occurred. Licorice extract also reduces melanin synthesis. Furthermore, licorice extractâ€2122s antioxidant activity has been shown to enhance the stability of other compounds when added to a topical dermatological cream.56

Summary
The FDAâ€2122s sun protection factor (SPF) rating system is inherently flawed in that it measures the effectiveness of sunscreen products against UV-B light, but not against deeper-penetrating UV-A light. Unfortunately, despite the FDAâ€2122s public acknowledgment of this shortcoming back in 2000, the rating system has still not been changed.

Natural topical products such as green tea extract, turmeric, and licorice root extract offer remarkable protection against premature skin aging and skin cancer that all too often result from excessive sun exposure and sunburn.

Your skin is designed to last a lifetime—treat it well, and it will!

References
LE Magazine, June 2006 - Report: The Sunscreen Paradox
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
"A sunscreen shouldn't contain unhealthy synthetic or chemical sun filters, yet most do. Instead choose a pure mineral sunscreen that will protect skin with zinc oxide, or titanium dioxide. Plus, all of them are made with organic plant ingredients that nurture the skin as they protect. Organic sunscreen remain on the surface of the skin, and don't get absorbed into the body which is a much healthier alternative"

Mineral & Organic Sunscreens

How to Make Organic Sunblock (ehow.com)

Getting outside for an afternoon of fun in the sun will healthier if you're wearing organic sunscreen. Make your own organic sunblock and you can avoid harmful synthetic chemicals added to commercial products. Making this recipe is simple and the ingredients are readily available at organic health food stores.

Email
Print Article

Add to Favorites
Flag Article

Difficulty: Moderately EasyInstructionsThings You'll Need:
Double boiler
Handheld mixer
Storage jar
2 1/2 oz. sesame oil
1 1/2 oz. coconut oil
1/2 oz. beeswax
4 oz. distilled water or green tea
2 tbsp. of zinc oxide
1 tbsp. wheat germ oil
10 to 20 drops antiseptic essential oil (optional)
1 tsp. vitamin C powder
200 IU vitamin A
Step 1Gather the ingredients needed to make your organic sunblock.

Step 2Assemble and heat the double boiler to medium temperature.

Step 3Combine sesame oil, coconut oil and beeswax in the double boiler and warm over medium heat.

Step 4Remove from heat and pour in green tea or distilled water.

Step 5Mix with electric handheld mixer until the ingredients are thick and smooth.

Step 6Add zinc oxide, wheat germ oil, vitamin C and vitamin A.

Step 7Drop in essential oils--if desired--and blend well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
LOL, hey per, tell us how its not bad, I know but you have far better knowledge when it comes to this and also to reassure the rest of us who are using chemical sunscreens
.



Skin | care | talk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
I'm not knocking physical sunscreens. They have their place. A combination of both chemical and physical sunscreens is best.

Are sunscreens toxic?
There is no evidence that currently used sunscreens are toxic, though safety concerns have been expressed about some UV filters. For example, Padimate O/Octyl Dimethyl PABA has been shown to be photomutagenic.19 Padimate O is infrequently used; I mostly see it in health food store sunscreens. The photo-oxidation of oxybenzone/benzophenone-3 was observed in a commercial sunscreen preparation, and was shown in vivo to cause inactivation of important antioxidant systems in the human epidermis, indicating "that this substance may be rather harmful to the homeostasis of the epidermis."20 Oxybenzone/benzophenone-3 is systemically absorbed and excreted in urine at a much higher rate than other sunscreen filters.21 22 It has been suggested that "it would be prudent not to apply oxybenzone to large surface areas of skin for extended and repeated periods of time..."23 and that it is inadvisable to use oxybenzone-containing sunscreens on children.24 The high systemic absorption of oxybenzone may be of concern since some studies have shown that oxybenzone is estrogenic. However, please note that "SCCNFP is of the opinion that the organic UV-filters used in cosmetic sunscreen products, allowed in the EU market today, have no estrogenic effects that could potentially affect human health." In addition, this article on the safety of UV filters may be of interest. Finally, concerns have also been expressed about the safety of 4-MBC, which is not approved for use in the US.

Of course, one cannot guarantee the safety of any cosmetic ingredient, synthetic or "natural." For example, some "natural" products contain comfrey, which is carcinogenic.25 And, there exist safety concerns about "ordinary" cosmetic ingredients such as polyacrylamide and triethanolamine (TEA).26 27 Hence, one must weigh the potential risk that a UV filter (or any cosmetic ingredient) may be found to pose safety concerns against the known carcinogenicity of UV radiation. "Several studies on the absorption of sunscreens by human skin showed a very limited and insignificant absorption of the majority of the sunscreens commonly used, with one exception, the benzophenone-3, warranting further investigation of its continued application...The available lines of evidence clearly indicate that the protective effects of sunscreens are far more significant than any potential risk the compounds themselves might pose."28 Finally, the latest research has concluded that there is no association between melanoma and sunscreen use, thus contradicting claims that sunscreen use causes skin cancer.29 Indeed, daily sunscreen use has been shown to reduce the risk of squamous cell carcinoma.30 In my opinion, the greatest health risk posed by sunscreen use is Vitamin D deficiency. Please see the section on Vitamin D for more info on this very important vitamin.

http://makeupalley.com/account/sn.as...e=sunscreenFAQ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
Natural sun screens are better than chemical sunscreens? Are you joking?
Yea I forgot to comment on that. While green tea and the other ingredients are nice to have in a sunscreen/moisturizer etc, they would offer a piss poor job of providing any serious uv protection by themselves compared to real sun fighting ingredients such as the mexoryls, tinosorbs, zinc, titanium dioxide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
who said toxic?

zinc & titanium oxides are natural.

guess some people simply have little to no concern for their biological footprint, nor the unknown risks of applying newly invented, synthetics chemicals all over their body. PABA was the main sunblock used for over 60 YRS until the industry realized all the side effects and pulled it out of most products only very recently:

"The first commercial sunscreen was developed in 1928, featuring the UV protectant PABA (P-AminoBenzoic Acid). Although PABA is very effective at absorbing UVB and is a low-cost chemical compound, it had many drawbacks. The use of these PABA compounds in sunscreens continued up until the 1970’s when scientists developed PABA esters that decreased its water-solubility, and thus provided the first advancement towards a waterproof sunscreen. In 1989 a report was released that questioned the safety of the highly used PABA ester Padimate-O. Little evidence was found to support the fears of its potential carcinogenic degradation, but the popularity of any product containing Padimate-O dwindled. PABA and PABA esters are no longer a common ingredient in sunscreens. "





no one said "by themselves" in fact, if you look at the new ones like mexoryls, u'll still see like 5-6 or more other sunscreen ingredients in "mexoryl" products.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
33,844 Posts
Guesswhoiam-

Exactly what is cosmeticsbuisness.com? Are you here to promote something, sell something, trying to get foot traffic on your web-site...........???????
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
33,844 Posts
^ its a cosmetics info database, and its not my website.

its simply my fave resource.. other than skincaretalk.
Where does the data come from? I have never been on that site before. Is it worth checking out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,401 Posts
who said toxic?

zinc & titanium oxides are natural.

guess some people simply have little to no concern for their biological footprint, nor the unknown risks of applying newly invented, synthetics chemicals all over their body. PABA was the main sunblock used for over 60 YRS until the industry realized all the side effects and pulled it out of most products only very recently:

"The first commercial sunscreen was developed in 1928, featuring the UV protectant PABA (P-AminoBenzoic Acid). Although PABA is very effective at absorbing UVB and is a low-cost chemical compound, it had many drawbacks. The use of these PABA compounds in sunscreens continued up until the 1970â€2122s when scientists developed PABA esters that decreased its water-solubility, and thus provided the first advancement towards a waterproof sunscreen. In 1989 a report was released that questioned the safety of the highly used PABA ester Padimate-O. Little evidence was found to support the fears of its potential carcinogenic degradation, but the popularity of any product containing Padimate-O dwindled. PABA and PABA esters are no longer a common ingredient in sunscreens. "





no one said "by themselves" in fact, if you look at the new ones like mexoryls, u'll still see like 5-6 or more other sunscreen ingredients in "mexoryl" products.
Who, my question to you is....Is this what YOU use? How does it work for you?? I always enjoy hearing personal experience from these type posts also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
Look at all this information. Everybody including me was sooo PRO chemical and didnt even think to consider and support PHYSICAL/NATURAL sunscreens last year; thank god for those members to have the courage to speak out.



Skin | care | talk
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top