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Something that helped me dramatically (wish I'd discovered this 15 years ago), make sure you have a softest water possible. I know it's a little weird to get used to if you've normally bathed in hard water, and even if you have soft water already this helps. I bought a little $35 softener from GE, from a hardware store and it's been amazing! It attaches in between your shower head and the pipe. Filters are relatively inexpensive as well. You can then use half the amount of soap.

Also, do NOT take really hot showers. It washes away much more of your body's natural oils than you need to, to be clean and makes things MUCH worse.
 

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Hi MsAdry
Hopefully this doesn't sound like a illy question but how can you tell whether your water is hard or not?
 

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Hi MsAdry
Hopefully this doesn't sound like a illy question but how can you tell whether your water is hard or not?
Not a silly question at all absoliite! If you see soap scum around your bath tub or shower that's a clue. If your soap and shampoo doesn't lather well, and if you see white crystallized minerals around your faucets, this all could mean you have hard water. They sell testers and you can check with the water dept in your area to find out for sure.



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Do you remember where you got this? We have really hard water (seriously...when I shower, gravel comes out :p) but are in a condo and hadn't found anything for at the faucet (as opposed to at the hot water tank in a house).

I'm def intrigued!
 

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I agree about bathing in filtered water. I have 3 boys & all have eczema. I bath them in lukewarm filtered water. Even when we go on holiday, we bath them using evian or spa water ( very expensive, i know) . As long as they are not scratching, im happy
 

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Go to a petstore, and ask for a water testing kit. Just use it on your shower water and it will tell your the hardness of your water.
 

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Hi MsAdry
Hopefully this doesn't sound like a illy question but how can you tell whether your water is hard or not?
Whooaa... sorry for the late reply. Both the ideas posted above are great. You can tell by how fast the water spots build up in your bathroom. If you clean and within a week you see a lot of white water spots you probably have hard water, the testing kit from the pet store is news to me, but sounds like a fabulous idea!
 

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Whooaa... sorry for the late reply. Both the ideas posted above are great. You can tell by how fast the water spots build up in your bathroom. If you clean and within a week you see a lot of white water spots you probably have hard water, the testing kit from the pet store is news to me, but sounds like a fabulous idea!
Hiii, thankyou and sorry for the late reply. I recently did buy a water testing kit, however it showed no evidence that I had hard water. Since it shows that, I guess it hasn't had much affect on my ezcema and its outbreaks. And even though I use cosmetics to help hide the appearance of my eczema and uneven skin tone - which can be pain at times
, do any of you have any suggestions to help me with my eczema please?
 

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I agree about bathing in filtered water. I have 3 boys & all have eczema. I bath them in lukewarm filtered water. Even when we go on holiday, we bath them using evian or spa water ( very expensive, i know) . As long as they are not scratching, im happy
Hello Lyd28, I was curious whether or not you put something in the water for them to bathe in as well as it being filtered. Becuase I have to use something called Oilatum to keep my skin moist, however, it doesn't seem to be helping. And since you said that the lukewarm water prevents scratching, do you think that would work with most people? (sorry I don't mean to be vague)
 

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Ditto! A water softner has dramatically changed the manageability of my curly hair and helped soften my skin. You can find them at any hardware store. Mine was cheap (like $15) and easy to install. Its the kind you screw right onto the shower nozzle.
 

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I rarely use water when I bathe, unless it's absolutely necessary... I read on an Irish eczema discussion board that using Cetaphil Gentle Cleanser as a WATERLESS bath helped a number of sufferers manage their eczema. This is the site that I found
www dot irishhealth dot com / clin / eczema / message dot php ? dis=4&topic=3381&ss=eczema
(this system won't let me post URL's yet... I'm too new here, but if you remove the spaces and add the http, it should get you to the Irish Health dot Com website or just PM me for the address).

A dermatologist I used to see recommends Cetaphil cleanser to her patients. Desperate to try anything that would give some relief, I went out and bought a bottle of Cetaphil and did the following:

1) I applied it to DRY skin -- i.e. I wasn't standing in the shower with the water pouring over me.

2) I rubbed it over a section of my skin with my DRY bare hand (not unlike how one would use a cloth or a loofah to wash) for at least 30 seconds or more. If I've been sweating or doing heavy work and need to scrub away the grime on my skin, I will use a Salux cloth to scour the sweat and grime away (do a Google search for "Salux Japanese Wash Cloths" for more information... they're available at Amazon, eBay or through specialty Japanese supermarkets).

3) Using a DRY cloth (size doesn't matter in this case... I usually use something a little larger than a tea towel but smaller than a bath sheet), I wiped the Cetaphil off the area I'd just "scrubbed." I DID NOT use any water on the cloth, and no water came in contact with my skin as I wiped the Cetaphil off.

I repeated those three steps until I'd "washed" my entire body (yes, the back can be a little tricky, but with a little bit of contortion, it IS possible to clean it). After I was finished, my skin felt clean, and my lesions felt soft (well, softer than when I was showering/bathing with water) and my skin didn't have that tight feeling to it that was customary when I washed with water.

I liked the results so much that it's how I wash my body 95% of the time (occasionally, I'll hop into the shower)... I find that while it takes a little more time to clean up this way in the beginning, it's worth it because you can do this practically anywhere (i.e. you don't necessarily need to be in the bathroom) and you don't have to spend your time drying yourself off before getting dressed. Once you get the hang of it, it can save you time if you're running late because you don't have to wait for the shower to heat up, scrub up, rinse off and then step out and towel off.

If you are skeptical about whether or not your skin is clean, try rinsing the cloth that you used in the sink. The Cetaphil will come off the cloth and go into the water, and with it any dirt that was on your skin will end up in the water as well.

If you find that Cetaphil brand cleanser is too expensive (it can go for as much as CAD 20$ for a 500mL bottle), the store brand works as well.
 

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Hello Lyd28, I was curious whether or not you put something in the water for them to bathe in as well as it being filtered. Becuase I have to use something called Oilatum to keep my skin moist, however, it doesn't seem to be helping. And since you said that the lukewarm water prevents scratching, do you think that would work with most people? (sorry I don't mean to be vague)
Hi absoliite,

Sorry for the late reply. I dont put anything in my son's bath. I tried using oilatum once, it made them itch. The filter i used is attached to the shower. I use QV soap from australia to soap them then after shower i put epaderm cream (wonderful stuff).

I use lukewarm cos too hot will dry their skin & to cold they wont shower
 
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